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Plants Matching herb

Returned 187 results. Page 16 of 19.

Image of Satureja hortensis photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Summer Savory)

The prized culinary herb, summer savory, is a must for herb and kitchen gardens. This annual mint has been cultivated for centuries to flavor food. It is thought to have originated in southeastern Europe, the Mediterranean and western Asia and has a delicious, peppery, herbal taste that compliments eggs, beans, peas, vegetable salads and summer stews. The leaves are a bit milder than the closely related, winter savory (Satureja montana).

Fragrant, lightly fuzzy, narrow leaves line...

Image of Satureja montana photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Winter Savory)

Just as wonderfully flavored but less common than summer savory, winter savory has fine green to grayish green leaves that can be used to flavor a myriad of vegetables and dishes. This low-growing, semi-woody perennial also has visual garden appeal with its dense foliage and pretty summer flowers. It is native to the open, rocky, mountainous regions of southern Europe, so it can withstand some drought too. The plants may have upright and bushy or prostrate and creeping habits, depending on the selection....

Image of Sesamum indicum photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Sesame)

A seedy spice commonly sprinkled onto breads, ground to make tahini or used to make pungently flavorful oil, sesame is native to Africa and possibly Central Asia, though it has naturalized across many tropical and subtropical regions beyond. It's an herbaceous annual with an upright habit. Each sun-loving plant produces many seeds that will self-sow if not collected for culinary use. Sesame seeds and oil have a distinctive nutty flavor and are important in many cuisines worldwide.

Sesame is a...

Image of Stevia rebaudiana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Candyleaf, Stevia, Sweetleaf)

While Europeans and North Americans focused their needs for sweetness in honey and sugarcane, native peoples in South America were adding stevia leaves to the beverage mate for centuries. Also called sweet-herb-of-Paraguay, sweetleaf and candyleaf, stevia's foliage is filled with glycosides that lack calories and are up to 30 times sweeter than cane sugar. This frost-tender evergreen subshrub is native from the American Southwest to Paraguay. However, it is grown in gardens as a tender herbaceous...

Image of Symphytum officinale photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Common Comfrey)

Long cultivated as a medicinal plant, comfrey is a large, coarse, rhizomatous perennial from forests of Europe and Asia.

The hairy, gray- to mid-green, oval to lance-shaped leaves of this hardy perennial are borne on tall, bristly stems that arise in spring from deep thick underground rhizomes. Curving clusters of bell-shaped, bee-pollinated flowers appear at the stem tips from late spring into summer. The flowers range in color from pink to purple to white. Plants often self-sow profusely if...

Image of Tanacetum balsamita photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Beaver Tongue, Costmary, Lady's Herb, Painted Daisy)

Beloved for its soft foliage that smells of balsam, mint or bubblegum when crushed, costmary also bears small golden flowers in late summer and early fall. Spreading into a clumping mat, this perennial that grows from rhizomes (underground stems) is native to Europe eastward into central Asia.

The plant forms basal leaves that are held upright. They are softly hairy, light green with lighter gray green undersides and are shaped like oblong ovals. Their edges have tiny scallops. In late summer,...

Image of Teucrium chamaedrys photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Wall Germander)

Pretty, crisp, evergreen leaves cover the attractive and much underused wall germander. Mediterranean in origin, this semi-woody perennial is quite winter hardy and drought tolerant once established. It has a low, spreading habit and stiff, upright branches that look especially handsome spilling over garden walls, troughs or containers.

Though a member of the mint family, the small, leathery, dark green leaves of this Old World ornamental herb are not fragrant. On occasion, the glossy leaves...

Image of Teucrium chamaedrys

James H. Schutte

(Golden Wall Germander, Wall Germander)

Pretty, crisp, evergreen leaves cover the attractive and much underused wall germander. Mediterranean in origin, this semi-woody perennial is quite winter hardy and drought tolerant once established. It has a low, spreading habit and stiff, upright branches that look especially handsome spilling over garden walls, troughs or containers.

Though a member of the mint family, the small, leathery, dark green leaves of this Old World ornamental herb are not fragrant. On occasion, the glossy leaves...

Image of Thymus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Thyme)

Well-established in English gardens well before the mid-Sixteenth Century, common thyme is a versatile herb and only one of the approximately 350 species of genus Thymus. The exact origin most thymes is uncertain because these valued medicinal and culinary herbs have been moved by man for so long and tend to establish themselves where planted. Generally speaking, they exist in the drier climates of Europe and Asia.

Thyme plants are semi-woody perennials that are low-growing. Most...

Image of Thymus

Mark A. Miller

(Clear Gold Thyme, Thyme, Transparent Yellow Thyme)

Well-established in English gardens well before the mid-Sixteenth Century, common thyme is a versatile herb and only one of the approximately 350 species of genus Thymus. The exact origin most thymes is uncertain because these valued medicinal and culinary herbs have been moved by man for so long and tend to establish themselves where planted. Generally speaking, they exist in the drier climates of Europe and Asia.

Thyme plants are semi-woody perennials that are low-growing. Most...