Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching herb / vegetable

Returned 1482 results. Page 44 of 149.

Image of Crocus chrysanthus

Jesse Saylor

(E.P. Bowles Crocus, Snow Crocus)

Freely producing its cheerful, sunny blossoms in the waning chill of late winter, this native of southeastern Europe and western and central Turkey is a quintessential harbinger of spring. It has also teamed with the white-flowered C. biflorus to produce numerous white-, yellow-, and blue-flowered hybrids known as "snow crocuses."

Like all other crocuses, this diminutive herbaceous perennial grows from a small bulb-like storage organ known as a corm. In late winter or early...

Image of Crocus minimus photo by: Debbie Schilling

Debbie Schilling

(Spring Crocus)

Most gardeners know the delight of the first crocus of spring. Relatively few, though, have experienced the joy of crocuses at other seasons. Yet, in their native haunts in Europe and western Asia, these hardy herbaceous "bulbs" are as much a presence at the growing season's end as at its beginning.

Crocus are members of the Iris family, Iridaceae. They bear chalice-shaped flowers of yellow, blue, purple, or white with long floral tubes that extend underground and may bloom in winter,...

Image of Crocus sativus photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Saffron Crocus)

A modest flower is the source for the world's most expensive spice: saffron. Although its precise origin is obscure, saffron crocus is believed to be an ancient selection of the Greek native Crocus cartwrightianus.

A small herbaceous perennial that grows from a bulb-like storage organ known as a corm, saffron crocus sends up one to five pale to medium lilac-purple flowers in mid- to late fall. But it is mainly grown for the flavorful, three-branched, orange-red style that ornaments each...

(Sieber's Crocus)

Opening its winsome blooms with the first hints of spring, this variable crocus from southeastern Europe and Crete was introduced to gardens in the nineteenth century.

Growing from a small bulb-like storage organ known as a corm, this diminutive herbaceous perennial sends up one to three lilac-blue, violet, or white flowers in winter or early spring, just as the grassy green leaves appear. Borne singly on short, erect, stalk-like floral tubes, the six-"petaled" flowers open wide in bright sun...

Image of Crocus sieberi ssp. atticus

Debbie Schilling

(Sieber's Crocus)

Opening its winsome blooms with the first hints of spring, this variable crocus from southeastern Europe and Crete was introduced to gardens in the nineteenth century.

Growing from a small bulb-like storage organ known as a corm, this diminutive herbaceous perennial sends up one to three lilac-blue, violet, or white flowers in winter or early spring, just as the grassy green leaves appear. Borne singly on short, erect, stalk-like floral tubes, the six-"petaled" flowers open wide in bright sun...

Image of Crocus x luteus

Ednie Flower Bulb, Inc.

(Golden Crocus)

Glowing like drops of sunlight in the late winter and early spring garden, the golden yellow flowers of this hybrid crocus are wonderful among snowdrops and tommy crocuses. A small herbaceous perennial that grows from a corm (bulb-like storage organ), it is sterile and thus does not self-sow. It slowly forms larger clumps through multiplication of its corms.

Golden, cup-shaped, six-"petaled" flowers, one to two per corm, arise on short stalk-like floral tubes in early spring, blooming with the...

Image of Cucumis melo photo by: Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

(Cantaloupe, Casaba Melon, Honey Dew, Melon, Muskmelon)

Garden fresh melons are truly a summertime treat. Fragrant and delicious, these warm season fruits have been bred and revered by cultures worldwide and come in all shapes, sizes and colors. Muskmelons, cantaloupes and "late melons," like honeydew and casaba, are all Cucumis melo variants believed to have origins in Africa.

Melons are tropical annual vines with long, spreading stems that cling via springy tendrils. Their big lobed leaves are coarse, fuzzy and medium to deep green. Bright...

Image of Cucumis melo

All-America Selections

(Canary Melon)

This 2004 All-America Selections Winner boasts lovely compact melons with beautiful golden yellow skin, small seed cavities and sweet ivory flesh. The prolific vines of this canary melon are resilient and produce lots of 2 to 3 pound fruits that are ready for harvest around 70 days after planting. They are also more compact than average, making them well-suited to smaller garden spaces.

Melons are tropical annual vines with long, spreading stems that cling via springy tendrils. Their big lobed...

Image of Cucumis melo

James H. Schutte

(Ananas d'Amerique A Chair Verte Melon, Melon)

The heirloom pineapple melon, 'Ananas d'Amerique A Chair Verte', translates to “pineapple of America with green flesh", so it has roots in both France and America. Its elongated oval fruits have greenish-tan netted skin and firm, ivory or pale green flesh that’s sweet, fragrant and somewhat like pineapple. The vines produce lots small to medium pound fruits that are ready for harvest around 75 to 80 days after planting. This cultivar may also be sold under the name “ananas.”

Melons are tropical...

Image of Cucumis melo

All-America Selections

(Cantaloupe)

Named for its heavenly flavor, ‘Angel’ is a vigorous melon that was recognized as a 2003 All-America Selections Winner. The 2 to 3 pound fruits have yellow and green netted skin, small seed cavities and fragrant, crisp, white flesh within. The fast-growing vines are relatively compact and produce melons only 60 days after planting.

Melons are tropical annual vines with long, spreading stems that cling via springy tendrils. Their big lobed leaves are coarse, fuzzy and medium to deep green. Bright...