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Plants Matching needled or scaled evergreen

Returned 512 results. Page 29 of 52.

Image of Picea abies

James H. Schutte

(Norway Spruce, Weeping Norway Spruce)

This beautifully pendulous cultivar of Norway spruce is highly popular because it is easy to grow, very hardy and beautiful. It is a large, fast growing, evergreen that originates from Europe.

There is quite a bit of variability in these trees. Some have a strong upright trunk, while others don’t, and the branches may be strongly pendulous and weeping to lightly drooping. Width also may vary. Some specimens are more upright while others have spreading horizontal branches. The short, angled...

Image of Picea abies

Mark A. Miller

(Norway Spruce)

Growing exceedingly slowly into a flattened mound with bristling upright branch tips, 'Pumila' is a dwarf cultivar of Norway spruce, a large, hardy, fast growing evergreen conifer native to Europe. Spherical when young, this cultivar gradually broadens with age, eventually forming a diminutive shrub more than twice as wide as high. The crowded branches have short sharp dark green needles.

This plant prefers full sun and moist well-drained non-alkaline soil. It is a candidate for rock gardens,...

Image of Picea abies

James H. Schutte

(Norway Spruce, Spreading Norway Spruce)

Growing slowly into a low, spreading, broadly conical mound, 'Repens' is a cultivar of Norway spruce, a large, hardy, fast growing evergreen conifer native to Europe. The branches slant uniformly upwards, giving the plant a layered, textured look. The crowded branchlets have short sharp dark green needles.

This plant prefers full sun and moist humus-rich well-drained soil. It is a candidate for rock gardens, mixed borders, foundation plantings, and bonsai collections.

Image of Picea abies

Mark A. Miller

(Norway Spruce)

Native to Europe, this large, fast growing, pyramidal evergreen with drooping branchlets and long brown cones is one of the most widely planted hardy conifers. Its graceful habit and rich green foliage provide year-round ornamental interest. The short, sharp-tipped needles point forward. The bark is grayish-brown with orange undertones. Many cultivars are available, including numerous dwarf selections.

Like most spruces, this adaptable tree prefers full sun and moderately moist, well drained...

Image of Picea abies

Jessie Keith

(Norway Spruce)

Native to Europe, this large, fast growing, pyramidal evergreen with drooping branchlets and long brown cones is one of the most widely planted hardy conifers. Its graceful habit and rich green foliage provide year-round ornamental interest. The short, sharp-tipped needles point forward. The bark is grayish-brown with orange undertones. Many cultivars are available, including numerous dwarf selections.

Like most spruces, this adaptable tree prefers full sun and moderately moist, well drained...

Image of Picea abies

Mark A. Miller

(Norway Spruce, Virgata Norway Spruce)

Native to Europe, this large, fast growing, pyramidal evergreen with drooping branchlets and long brown cones is one of the most widely planted hardy conifers. Its graceful habit and rich green foliage provide year-round ornamental interest. The short, sharp-tipped needles point forward. The bark is grayish-brown with orange undertones. Many cultivars are available, including numerous dwarf selections.

Like most spruces, this adaptable tree prefers full sun and moderately moist, well drained...

Image of Picea asperata photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Dragon Spruce, Yun Shan)

A stately evergreen tree not often grown in Western landscapes, the dragon spruce boasts colorful foliage, shoots and bark. Native to the highlands of western central China, especially the Sichuan province, it is an increasingly endangered tree species. This evergreen attains an plump cone-shaped habit. Oldest trees are more upright, open and horizontally to pendulous branched. Its bark is scaly and gray with hints of brown and lavender.

The blue-green to drab dark green needles are four-sided...

Image of Picea engelmannii photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Engelmann Spruce)

At first glance, you may think you've seen a svelt Colorado blue spruce. Engelmann's spruce also has attractive steel blue to blue-green needles, but becomes a more slender, spire-like tree when mature. This evergreen conifer is native to a large expanse of the southern Canadian Rockies as well as the American Rocky Mountains and surrounding ranges at high elevations. The bark is reddish brown and scaly. The branches are rather short but persist on the lowest parts of the trunk, often hiding the...

Image of Picea engelmannii

Mark A. Miller

(Compact Engelmann Spruce, Engelmann Spruce)

A rounded, dwarf selection of the Engelmann's spruce, 'Compact' resembles an upright miniature Colorado blue spruce. This evergreen conifer is native to a large expanse of the southern Canadian Rockies as well as the American Rocky Mountains and surrounding ranges at high elevations. The bark is reddish brown and scaly. The branches are rather short but persist on the lowest parts of the trunk, often hiding the trunk base as this shrubby plant becomes taller and aged. This plant becomes a plump cone...

Image of Picea glauca photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(White Spruce)

White spruce is a tall evergreen conifer native to the northern United States and Canada. Broadly pyramidal when young, it becomes more columnar with age. Its cones are relatively small. Crushed needles emit a pungent, skunky smell. Many cultivars of white spruce are available, including those with smaller mature sizes or dwarfed and weeping habits.

White spruce grows best in full sun and moist, well-drained soil that is acidic to neutral in pH. It tolerates drought, salt spray, extreme cold,...