Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching needled or scaled evergreen

Returned 512 results. Page 3 of 52.

Image of Abies firma photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Japanese Fir, Momi Fir)

The wood of the momi fir is light colored and traditionally used to make coffins in its native Japan. A tall-growing evergreen, momi fir grows in Japan's highlands intermixed with other conifers. This tree grows slowly in its youth, retaining a dense, upright pyramid shape. When mature, the straight trunk becomes massive and the scattered horizontal branches look somewhat like the silhouette of an old white pine.

The emerald green needles are flattened and are alternating on the twigs in two...

Image of Abies fraseri photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Fraser Fir)

Fraser fir is a fragrant evergreen tree native to the Appalachian Mountains of the southeastern United States, from Virginia down to Georgia. Native populations grow at both high and low elevations along the mountainside. They exist in nearly pure stands at high elevations but are mixed with other conifers and hard woods at mid to lower elevations. Young trees are dense and pyramidal, which is why they are favored as Christmas trees. In fact, Frasier is only rivaled in popularity by balsam fir. Mature...

(Giant Fir, Grand Fir)

This species is appropriately called the giant or grand fir because it's one of the tallest growing firs in the world, usually in the 200- to 300-foot (70 to 100 m) range. This evergreen is very fast growing, attaining a narrow column-like or spire-like silhouette with massive trunk. Native to the central Pacific coast of North America, the giant fir grows in British Columbia inland to the Idaho-Montana mountains and southward to northern California, where it's known along the coast. Some botanists...

Image of Abies holophylla photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Manchurian Fir, Needle Fir)

Large in size but not as towering as many other firs grown, needle fir has rich green foliage that thickly whorls around its twigs. Becoming a tall, pyramid-like tree with spreading branches, it is native to Manchuria and Korea and extreme southeastern Siberia's (Russia). Its youngest twigs are yellow-gray in color while its smooth bark is a purplish gray to dark sandy brown that will crack into plates once the tree is very old.

The glossy medium to dark green needles are not prickly to the touch...

Image of Abies homolepis photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Nikko Fir)

Densely foliaged branches with glossy dark green needles makes the Nikko fir one of the most stately of fir species, although quite difficult to locate in nurseries. A tall evergreen conifer (cone-bearing) tree from Japan, it attains a spire-like shape but also becomes more pyramidal with age.

The glossy dark green needles have two white bands on their undersides. Densely lining all branches, the needles are held both horizontally and vertically, although the latter are shed earlier. New twig...

Image of Abies koreana photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Korean Fir)

A smaller-sized fir, Korean fir has glossy dark green needles with silvery undersides and blue-violet tinted green cones. A slow growing conifer from the southern half of the Korean peninsula, this is considered one of the more heat-tolerant fir species. It is best in cooler regions, however.

The horizontal branches of this fir tree grow slowly, and are light brown at their tips. The tree becomes a broad pyramid in shape with considerable age. The needles are soft and dark gray-green with a silvery...

Image of Abies koreana

James H. Schutte

(Korean Fir)

A smaller-sized fir, Korean fir has glossy dark green needles with silvery undersides and blue-violet tinted green cones. A slow growing conifer from the southern half of the Korean peninsula, this is considered one of the more heat-tolerant fir species. It is best in cooler regions, however.

The horizontal branches of this fir tree grow slowly, and are light brown at their tips. The tree becomes a broad pyramid in shape with considerable age. The needles are soft and dark gray-green with a silvery...

Image of Abies koreana

James H. Schutte

(Korean Fir, Silver Korean Fir)

A smaller-sized fir, Silberlocke Korean fir has upright-facing, lightly twisting needles that show off their silvery undersides. A slow growing conifer from the southern half of the Korean peninsula, this is considered one of the more heat-tolerant fir species. It is best in cooler regions, however.

The horizontal branches of this fir tree grow slowly, and are light brown at their tips. The tree becomes a broad pyramid in shape with considerable age. The twisted needles are soft and dark gray-green...

Image of Abies lasiocarpa photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Rocky Mountain Fir, Subalpine Fir)

Very tall and narrow in form, subalpine fir looks like a green church spire. A cone-bearing evergreen tree with green needles that have a bluish cast, it is native from the Yukon of Canada southward in the Rocky Mountains to northern Arizona and New Mexico in the United States. Its bark is gray to nearly white, smooth but mildly bumpy.

The short but flattened needles whorl around the tree's twigs. They are dark green but covered in a bluish-white film (called a bloom). In early summer, male cones...

Image of Abies lasiocarpa

James H. Schutte

(Subalpine Fir)

Very tall and narrow in form, subalpine fir looks like a green church spire. A cone-bearing evergreen tree with green needles that have a bluish cast, it is native from the Yukon of Canada southward in the Rocky Mountains to northern Arizona and New Mexico in the United States. Its bark is gray to nearly white, smooth but mildly bumpy.

The short but flattened needles whorl around the tree's twigs. They are dark green but covered in a bluish-white film (called a bloom). In early summer, male cones...