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Plants Matching needled or scaled evergreen

Returned 512 results. Page 35 of 52.

Image of Pinus canariensis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Canary Island Pine)

The largest Old World pine, this Canary Islands native makes a striking evergreen tree for gardens with ample space and minimal frost.

This cold-tender pine bears exceptionally long needles in bundles of three. Young plant have blue-green needles; older plants have bright green foliage. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large curved female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with fleshy green scales that become woody and gray-brown as they mature....

Image of Pinus cembra photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Swiss Stone Pine)

This slow-growing tree from mountains of Europe and western Asia is prized for its compact, symmetrical, upright habit.

The long, stiff, dark-green to blue-green needles of this hardy conifer occur in bundles of five. In spring, trees produce tiny male and female cones near the branch tips. Female cones persist 3 years, maturing to purple-blue and then brown. Mature female cones are the size and shape of a large egg, and do not open.

A slow-growing, pyramidal to columnar tree with upswept...

(Swiss Stone Pine)

A slow-growing tree from mountains of Europe and western Asia, Swiss stone pine is prized for its compact, symmetrical, upright form. The cultivar 'Compacta Glauca' has blue-green needles and a narrow, semi-dwarf habit.

The long, stiff, blue-green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of five. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and larger female cones near the branch tips. Female cones persist 3 years, maturing to purple-blue and then brown. Mature female cones are the size...

Image of Pinus cembra

James H. Schutte

(Swiss Stone Pine)

This slow-growing tree from mountains of Europe and western Asia is prized for its compact, symmetrical, upright habit.

The long, stiff, dark-green to blue-green needles of this hardy conifer occur in bundles of five. In spring, trees produce tiny male and female cones near the branch tips. Female cones persist 3 years, maturing to purple-blue and then brown. Mature female cones are the size and shape of a large egg, and do not open.

A slow-growing, pyramidal to columnar tree with upswept...

Image of Pinus cembroides photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Mexican Stone Pine)

Famous for its edible nut-like seeds, this small evergreen tree from Mexico and the Southwest United States is well suited for desert gardens.

This cold-hardy pine bears short, curved, dark green needles in bundles of three. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and ovate female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with fleshy green scales that become woody and reddish-brown as they mature. Two-year-old female cones release large edible seeds before falling...

(Alabame Pine, Sand Pine)

This small to medium evergreen tree occurs in acid sandy soil from southern Florida to southeastern Alabama. This short-lived, gangly pine has twisted, rather short, dark green needles in bundles of two. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and egg-shaped female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with fleshy green scales that become woody and yellowish-brown as they mature. The scales of 2-year-old female cones open in summer to release winged seeds. The female...

Image of Pinus contorta photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Beach Pine)

A highly variable, small to large evergreen tree found at low to high altitudes over much of western North America, this Pinus encompasses several varieties including lodgepole pine, P. contorta var. latifolia. This compact to lofty pine bears rather short, yellow green to dark green needles in bundles of two on red-brown, sometimes twisted branchlets. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and short, oblong to rounded female cones on the previous year's growth....

Image of Pinus contorta

James H. Schutte

(Beach Pine)

The cultivar 'Willow Creek' is a slow-growing selection of Pinus contorta, a small to large evergreen tree found at low to high altitudes over much of western North America. This cultivar was propagated from a witch's broom by renowned dwarf-conifer expert Jerry Morris. This cultivar bears curving, grass-green needles in bundles of two on short, crowded, ascending branches that end in conical clusters of reddish tan buds.. It grows very slowly into a compact, dense, broadly conical mound....

Image of Pinus contorta var. latifolia photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Lodgepole Pine)

A medium to large evergreen tree found at low to high altitudes over much of western North America, this pine was favored by American Indians as a teepee support. This often lofty pine bears rather short, yellow green in bundles of two on red-brown branchlets. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and short, lopsided, oblong to rounded female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with fleshy green scales that turn woody and brown as they mature. The scales of 2-year-old...

Image of Pinus densiflora photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Japanese Red Pine, Tanyosho Pine)

The broad-spreading, picturesque habit and handsome bark of this East Asian native make it a favorite for gardens and bonsai worldwide. A fast-growing, medium to large tree in the wild, it has given rise to numerous ornamental cultivars of various coloration and size.

The twisted, bright green to bluish green needles of this pine occur in bundles of two. They cluster at the tips of twigs that are held on long, horizontal, often sinuous branches. The lower branches are usually shed, exposing...