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Plants Matching needled or scaled evergreen

Returned 512 results. Page 37 of 52.

Image of Pinus flexilis

Jesse Saylor

(Limber Pine)

This handsome, cold-hardy, small- to medium-sized evergreen tree comes from mountains of western North America from Canada to Mexico.

The medium to long, supple, bluish-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five toward the tips of long flexible branches. The densely borne needles have conspicuous white lines on their upper surface. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large female cones near the branch tips. The yellowish brown female cones mature in 2 years, dropping...

Image of Pinus halepensis photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Aleppo Pine)

A Mediterranean native valued for its exceptional heat- and drought-tolerance, this medium-sized evergreen tree is often planted in California and the Southwest United States.

The short, bright green needles of this pine occur in bundles of two. They are rather sparsely borne on short upright branches which form an open, rounded, irregular crown. In spring, tiny male cones and larger female cones appear near the branch tips. The egg-shaped, yellowish brown female cones angle backward from...

(Bosnian Pine, Heldreich Pine )

A close relative of Bosnian pine, this slow-growing evergreen tree is prized for its toughness and beauty. It is native to the Balkans.

This dense, sometimes shrubby pine bears long, rigid, sharp, medium- to dark-green needles in bundles of two. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and oblong, egg-shaped female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with purple scales that turn woody and yellowish brown as they mature. In their second year, female cones open their...

Image of Pinus heldreichii

Mark A. Miller

(Bosnian Pine, Green Bun Bosnian Pine)

This dwarf cultivar of the Balkan native Pinus heldreichii slowly forms a dense domed to conical mound of dark green needles.

This diminutive pine bears long, rigid, sharp, dark green needles in bundles of two. It slowly forms a medium-sized, rounded to conical shrub with closely spaced, upright branches.

Heldreich pine does best in ample sun and moist, well-drained, acidic to alkaline soil. Its tolerance of salt spray makes it a great selection for seaside landscapes. This beautiful...

Image of Pinus koraiensis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Korean Pine)

This handsome but under-utilized pine from eastern Asia slowly forms a dense, somewhat conical, medium-sized tree.

The long, rather stout, dark-green to blue-green needles of this hardy evergreen conifer occur in bundles of five on fuzzy reddish-brown branchlets. In spring, trees produce tiny male and larger female cones near the branch tips. The erect, conical to ovoid female cones are green maturing to brown. They ripen their second year, falling from the tree without releasing their large...

Image of Pinus lambertiana photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Shake Pine, Sugar Pine)

Renowned for its mammoth cones, this evergreen tree grows to gargantuan heights in its native haunts in the western North American mountains. In cultivation it is typically of more modest size.

The long, blue-green needles of this pine occur in bundles of five on horizontal to slightly drooping branches. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and enormous cylindrical female cones near the branch tips. The solitary or clustered female cones are sheathed with fleshy green scales that turn...

Image of Pinus longaeva photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bristlecone Pine, Great Basin Bristlecone Pine)

Formerly considered a subspecies of bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), this small, slow-growing evergreen tree from the high country of Utah, Nevada, and eastern California is noted for its picturesque, gnarled form and its extraordinary longevity. Specimens of approximately 5000 years are known. Plants bear short, stiff, medium-green to yellow-green needles in bunches of five. The needles persist for many years, forming long dense brushy clusters at the ends of the horizontal to pendent...

Image of Pinus montezumae photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Montezuma Pine)

A majestic evergreen tree with a massive trunk and a dense crown of long elegant drooping needles, this five-needled pine from the mountains of Mexico and Central America is considerably hardier than its tropical origins would suggest.

The long, plumy, blue-green needles of this lofty pine occur in bundles of five on stiff, stout reddish-brown branchlets. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large conical to ovoid female cones near the branch tips. The female cones are sheathed with...

Image of Pinus monticola photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(California Mountain Pine, Silver Pine)

A close relative of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus), this medium to tall evergreen tree inhabits the mountains of western North America. It is the state tree of Idaho.

The long, supple, blue-green needles of this pine occur in bundles of five on reddish-brown, hairy branchlets that age to deep brown or gray. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large, cylindrical, often curved female cones near the branch tips. The clustered, dangling female cones are sheathed with fleshy...

Image of Pinus mugo photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Mugho Pine, Mugo Pine, Swiss Mountain Pine)

Boulders and alpine plants look at home when in the presence of a mugho pine. This species is a dense, bushy, stiff-needled evergreen shrub native to the mountains of south-central Europe. The curved, twisted, dark green needles are paired. Small cones are borne toward the branch tips. Mugho pine is usually represented in gardens by one of the ubiquitous forms known collectively as the Pumilio Group. Although these are slow growing, they may eventually attain considerable size, especially in spread....