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Plants Matching needled or scaled evergreen

Returned 512 results. Page 40 of 52.

Image of Pinus pumila

Jesse Saylor

(Blue Dwarf Siberian Pine, Dwarf Siberian Pine)

Siberian dwarf pine is a low, spreading, handsome evergreen from East Asia. Its cultivar 'Glauca' (also sometimes known as 'Dwarf Blue') is a dense, mounded, small to medium shrub with striking silver-blue foliage.

The long, rigid, showy needles of this dwarf cultivar occur in bundles of five. They densely clothe the ascending to prostrate branches. In spring, plants produce clusters of tiny male cones and egg-shaped female cones near the branch tips. The erect cones are sheathed with fleshy,...

Image of Pinus pungens photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Hickory Pine, Table Mountain Pine)

This small, asymmetrical, often crooked-trunked pine is one of the characteristic tree species of the Appalachian Mountains from Pennsylvania to Georgia.

The short, stiff, dark bluish-green needles of this evergreen tree occur in bundles of two on rough, orange-brown to brown branches. The needles are twisted and sharp-tipped. In spring, plants produce clusters of tiny purple male cones and egg-shaped female cones near the branch tips. The clustered, often whorled female cones are sheathed...

Image of Pinus resinosa photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(American Red Pine, Norway Pine)

An important timber tree, this medium to large, horizontally branched pine is native from Newfoundland and the eastern United States to the northern Great Plains.

The long, rubbery, medium- to dark-green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of two. They are held toward the tips of spreading, reddish branches. The needles snap neatly in two when bent. In spring, tiny male cones and relatively small female cones appear near the branch tips. The squat, broadly conical, brown female...

Image of Pinus rigida photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Northern Pitch Pine, Pitch Pine)

A distinctive, medium-sized tree with irregular, horizontal branches, this tough, drought-tolerant pine inhabits sandy or rocky habitats over much of eastern North America.

The rigid, sharp, dark green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of three. They are held toward the tips of rough brown twigs that terminate in resinous buds. Plants have one to several trunks with dark red-brown, deeply furrowed bark, which often bears tufts of needles. In spring, tiny male cones and relatively...

Image of Pinus rigida

Mark A. Miller

(Pitch Pine, Sherman Eddy Pitch Pine)

Pitch pine is a distinctive, drought-tolerant, medium-sized tree native to sandy and rocky habitats over much of eastern North America. Its compact cultivar 'Sherman Eddy' slowly forms a small oval to conical tree with dense bristling foliage.

The rigid, sharp, medium-green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of three. They are held toward the tips of rough brown twigs that terminate in resinous buds. Plants have one to several trunks with dark red-brown, deeply furrowed bark,...

(Pond Pine, Swamp Pine)

A close relative of pitch pine, this small to medium-sized tree inhabits barrens and wetlands from extreme southern New Jersey to southwestern Alabama.

The dark green to yellow-green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of three. They are longer and more flexible than those of pitch pine. In spring, clusters of tiny male cones and egg-shaped female cones appear near the branch tips. The female cones are sheathed with fleshy green scales that turn woody and brown as they mature,...

Image of Pinus strobiformis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Mexican White Pine, Southwestern White Pine)

A close relative of limber pine (Pinus flexilis), this handsome, cold-hardy, medium-sized evergreen tree comes from mountains of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.

The medium to long, supple, bluish-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five toward the tips of long flexible branches. The densely borne needles differ from those of limber pine in their lack of white longitudinal stripes. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large cylindrical female...

Image of Pinus strobus photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(White Pine)

Valued as a landscape and lumber tree, white pine is a stately, fast-growing evergreen with supple green needles and dark grayish brown bark. It is distributed across the eastern half of North America, from Newfoundland to Georgia, and grows best in open, upland areas with well-drained soils. Mature specimens become very tall, have straight trunks and broad, pyramidal crowns.

The long, flexible needles come in fascicles (groups) of five. These are fully evergreen and shed every two to three...

Image of Pinus strobus

Mark A. Miller

(Bloomer's Dark Globe White Pine, White Pine)

Selected for its dwarf rounded habit, this small shrub little resembles the stately white pines that dominate much of the forest of eastern North America.

Like all white pines, this cultivar has long flexible evergreen needles in fascicles (bundles) of five. The needles are medium-green. This dwarf selection slowly forms a dense irregular globe of approximately chest height.

White pine grows best in full sun and well-drained sandy loam. It is moderately weak-wooded and can be damaged by...

Image of Pinus strobus

Jesse Saylor

(Dwarf White Pine)

This slower growing, shorter selection of white pine is a reliable compact landscape tree with shorter blue-green needles and dark grayish brown bark. Unlike the standard species, it develops a rounded crown and is less vulnerable to storm damage.

Valued as a landscape and lumber tree, white pine is a stately, fast-growing evergreen. It is distributed across the eastern half of North America, from Newfoundland to Georgia, and grows best in open, upland areas with well-drained soils. Mature specimens...