Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching palm or cycad

Returned 145 results. Page 13 of 15.

Image of Sabal etonia photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Scrub Palmetto)

A shrubby palm native to sandy ridges in central Florida, Sabal etonia is valued for its attractive foliage and its tough constitution.

Plants bear four to seven umbrella-sized, fan-shaped, evergreen fronds on long, stout, erect or inclined stems ("petioles"), forming a head-high clump. The yellowish green fronds are deeply divided into long, sword-shaped segments that bear drooping thread-like filaments at their base. The trunk is subterranean, protecting it from fire. The small fragrant...

Image of Sabal mauritiiformis photo by: Carol Cloud Bailey

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Bay-leaf Palm)

Beautiful and distinctive, this slender-trunked, medium to tall palm is especially noteworthy for its immense fan-shaped fronds, whose pale undersides shimmer in the landscape. It is native to coastal rainforests in Trinidad and from southeastern Mexico to Colombia.

Bright green above and silvery beneath, the evergreen fronds are deeply divided into approximately 60 sword-shaped segments that radiate like the ribs of a parasol. The segments often arch downward, creating a fountain effect. The...

Image of Sabal mexicana photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Mexican Sabal Palm, Texas Palmetto)

With large, fan-shaped leaves atop a straight trunk criss-crossed by the lingering bases of spent leaves, the Texas palmetto has a striking presence. A slow-growing plant with a thick trunk and seemingly robust canopy of fronds, it is native from the southern tip of Texas southward to El Salvador.

The fronds are large and fan-shaped, with deep incisions. Ranging in color from yellow-green to very dark green, the canopy of fronds is usually rounded and massive atop the straight, ringed, grayish-tan...

Image of Sabal miamiensis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Miami Palmetto)

Closely related to Sabal etonia, this shrubby palm from Southeast Florida may be extinct in the wild. Plants bear four to six umbrella-sized, fan-shaped, evergreen fronds on long, stout, erect or inclined stems ("petioles"), forming a chest-high clump. The yellowish green fronds are deeply divided into long, sword-shaped, gracefully arching segments that radiate like the spokes of a parasol. The trunk is subterranean, protecting it from fire. The small fragrant ivory flowers appear in late...

Image of Sabal minor photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Bush Palmetto, Dwarf Palmetto, Little Blue Stem, Swamp Palmetto)

This compact palm is considered a "semi-dwarf" because it often reaches no more than head height. It is native to the southern United States, from the Carolinas to Florida and across to Texas and is generally found swampy, shady locations. It is the northernmost naturally occurring palm in North America and has excellent cold hardiness that is surpassed only by the needle palm, Rhapidophyllum hystrix. Habit varies; more westerly populations of this palmetto tend to grow an upright trunk,...

Image of Sabal minor

James Burghardt

(Louisiana Dwarf Palmetto)

Its greater size and aerial (rather than subterranean) trunk set 'Louisiana' apart from most other dwarf palmettos. It is a selection of a rare trunk-forming variant found in the western part of the species' range. Native to moist habitats from the Carolinas to Texas, dwarf palmetto is the northernmost American palm, rivaling needle palm (Rhapidophyllum hystrix) in cold hardiness.

Plants bear four to ten bluish green, fan-shaped fronds atop stout trunks that grow slowly to head height....

Image of Sabal minor

Mark A. Miller

(Oklahoma Dwarf Palmetto)

This compact palm is considered a "semi-dwarf" because it often reaches no more than head height. It is native to the southern United States, from the Carolinas to Florida and across to Texas and is generally found swampy, shady locations. It is the northernmost naturally occurring palm in North America and has excellent cold hardiness that is surpassed only by the needle palm, Rhapidophyllum hystrix. Habit varies; more westerly populations of this palmetto tend to grow an upright trunk,...

Image of Sabal palmetto photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Blue Palmetto, Florida Cabbage Palm, Sabal Palm)

With its immense fan-shaped leaves, its stout straight wind-resistant trunk, and its exceptional cold hardiness, this slow-growing, medium-size palm is both beautiful and adaptable. Native to the Southeast United States from coastal North Carolina to Florida, it also occurs on the Bahamas.

The bold, deep green to yellowish green, evergreen fronds are divided into 60 or more long, arching, blade-like segments, that radiate like the spokes of an umbrella. The segments bear narrow, drooping, ribbon-like...

Image of Sabal palmetto

James Burghardt

(Lisa Cabbage Palm, Lisa Sabal Palm)

Bringing a new look to a familiar plant, 'Lisa' bears fronds that are stiffer and less divided than those of other cabbage palms. As with more typical forms of the species, its bold fan-shaped leaves, its stout straight wind-resistant trunk, and its exceptional cold hardiness make it a beautiful and adaptable landscape plant. A slow-growing, medium-sized palm, Florida cabbage palm is native to the Southeast United States from coastal North Carolina to Florida, and also occurs on the Bahamas. This...

Image of Sabal rosei photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Llanos Palmetto)

Bearing 15 to 30 immense fan-like fronds atop a slender straight trunk, this remarkably cold-hardy Sabal comes from savannas and deciduous forests in western Mexico. It grows slowly into a medium-sized palm.

The arching, green to bluish green, evergreen fronds are divided into 60 or more long, rigid, blade-like segments, that radiate like the spokes of an umbrella. The segments angle upwards, giving the fronds a "folded" appearance. The fronds are borne atop the trunk on long, erect...