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Plants Matching palm or cycad

Returned 145 results. Page 5 of 15.

Image of Copernicia ekmanii photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Ekman's Palm)

Bearing bold, colorful, fan-shaped fronds atop a solitary trunk, this small, slow-growing palm makes a great subject for tropical and subtropical gardens. It is a rare endemic of the north coast of Haiti.

Thirty to forty large, blue-green fronds with waxy silver-gray undersides are borne atop the slender trunk on long, erect or slanting stems ("petioles"), forming a domed crown. The fronds are divided into numerous stiff blade-like segments that radiate like the spokes of an umbrella. The petioles...

Image of Copernicia hospita photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Hospita Palm, Wax Palm)

Bearing bold, colorful, fan-shaped fronds, this small to medium-sized, slow-growing palm makes a great subject for tropical and subtropical gardens. It is native to savannas and open woodlands in Cuba.

Thirty to forty large, blue-green fronds with waxy gray undersides are borne atop the solitary trunk on long, upright or drooping stems ("petioles"), forming a domed crown. The fronds are divided into numerous stiff blade-like segments that radiate like the spokes of an umbrella. The petioles...

Image of Copernicia macroglossa photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cuban Petticoat Palm)

Distinguished by its spiky crown of bold, fan-shaped fronds, this unique, small palm comes from savannas of western Cuba.

Thirty to forty large, rich green, nearly stemless fronds crowd atop the solitary trunk, forming a domed, urchin-like crown. The fronds are divided into numerous stiff blade-like segments that radiate like the spokes of an umbrella. They may have waxy gray-green undersides. A picturesque "skirt" of dead leaves fringes the base of the crown, sometimes to the bottom of the...

Image of Copernicia prunifera photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Brazilian Wax Palm, Carnuba Wax Palm)

Valued as the source of carnauba wax, the bold, fan-shaped fronds of this medium-sized palm make a colorful splash in the tropical or subtropical garden. Wax palm is native to seasonally flooded savannas in northeastern Brazil.

About 30 large, blue-green fronds with waxy silver-gray undersides are borne atop the solitary trunk on long, upright or drooping stems ("petioles"), forming a spherical crown. The fronds are divided into numerous stiff blade-like segments that radiate like the spokes...

Image of Corypha photo by: Cumulus Clouds, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

Cumulus Clouds, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

(Corypha)

Gigantic, single-trunked palms comprise the genus Corypha, which means "summit" in Greek. This name is appropriate as it refers to the giant tip inflorescences (flower stalks) that culminate the life span of the palm. The eight palm species are evergreen and monocarpic, meaning they die once they flower. They're native to tropical southern and southeastern Asia and northern Australia.

When young, these palms are rather slow-growing, but pick up their pace once the trunk develops. The...

Image of Corypha utan photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Buri Palm, Gebang Palm)

One of the largest growing palms on the planet, the gebang palm also boasts astounding leaf fronds and a towering, Christmas tree-like flowering stalk. This evergreen palm that dies after it flowers is native to the riverbanks and fertile grasslands of tropical southern Asia to northern Australia. It attains an upright trunk with wide-spreading to V-shaped canopy as it ages.

When a seedling, the gebang palm is slow growing, but once a trunk develops its pace hastens. A healthy plant will produce...

Image of Cycas photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cycad, Sago)

Long leaves that resemble fern or palm fronds are typical of these slow-growing cycads. Between 80 and 100 species comprise the genus Cycas. It is a group of Old World cycads native to an expansive area that includes Japan, China, the Philippines, Taiwan, the Indian subcontinent and Sri Lanka as well as Southeast Asia. Member species also occur in Madagascar, the western Pacific and northern Australia. The most diverse species are Australian.

Cycads are ancient plants that date back...

Image of Cycas angulata photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Angled Blue Sago, Cycad, Marlborough Blue Sago)

The Marlborough blue sago is a slow-growing cycad that towers upward, looking like some type of date palm. This evergreen plant is cone-bearing and closely related to conifers. It is native to Australia, mainly around the Gulf of Carpentaria. This species is often considered the largest growing of all Cycas species.

Marlborough blue sago has long arching leaves (fronds) that are dark glossy gray-green and feathery. They are densely clustered - numbering up to 40 - at the tip of a...

Image of Cycas cairnsiana photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Australian Cycas, Mount Surprise Cycad, Mount Surprise Sago)

Feathery, steel-blue leaves make the rare Mount Surprise cycad a plant lover's dream. Native to northeastern Queensland, Australia, where it is endangered, this cone-bearing evergreen grows slowly with a short stem (caudex) that looks like a trunk. Cycads are primitive, non-flowering plants closely related to conifers.

New fronds emerge from the tip of the caudex in late spring. When they first emerge, they are soft and pale blue, but as they age their texture becomes pliable and plastic-like...

Image of Cycas circinalis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cycad, Queen Sago)

The queen sago is a lovely slow-growing cycad. This clump-forming evergreen is native to southeastern India and develops a tree-like appearance over time. Its very long leaves (fronds) are dark glossy green and feathery with individual leaflets that droop and curve slightly. The fronds are densely clustered and toothed on the lower part of the leaf stem. Fronds radiate from a central point at the top of a woody trunk-like stem. Newly emerging fronds are very soft, fuzzy and light green and tan. Plants...