Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching palm or cycad

Returned 145 results. Page 8 of 15.

Image of Encephalartos altensteinii photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Bread Tree, Prickly Cycad)

Impressively elegant in stature, the numerous frond-like leaves of Encephalartos altensteinii are stiff and held outright, with dark glossy green leaflets held at an upright angle. Native to rocky hillsides in extreme southeastern South Africa, this slow growing cycad often suckers at its base, producing a clump with great age.

The trunk-like stem of the bread tree is a combination of dark brown, tan and black. It is rich in starch, and was traditionally used by natives. At the stem's...

Image of Encephalartos ferox photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Zululand cycad)

Graceful and low in stature, the numerous frond-like leaves of Encephalartos ferox, the Zululand cycad, are stiff and held in an arching circle, with glossy green leaflets that have pronounced spines on their edges (which look like English holly leaves). Native to the coastal wooded grasslands of Mozambique and South Africa, this slow growing clumping cycad is considered one of the most admired of the African cycads; its species name of ferox means 'ferocious'.

Zululand cycad...

Image of Encephalartos gratus photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Malawi Cycad)

Impressive in size and stature, the numerous frond-like leaves of Encephalartos gratus are stiff and held upright, with dark glossy green leaflets that have prickly spines on their edges. Native to the rocky slopes along streams in the deciduous forest of Mozambique and Malawi in central southern Africa, this slow growing cycad is considered one of the most beautiful of the African cycads; its species name of gratus means “pleasant.”

The trunk-like stem of the Malawi cycad is...

Image of Encephalartos horridus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Horrible Blue Cycad, Spiny Blue Cycad)

Architecturally splendid in stature, the numerous sharp silvery blue leaves of Encephalartos horridus, the horrible blue cycad, are stiff and held in an upright but slightly arching cluster. Native to the hot, sunny scrub and rocky ridges of the Eastern Cape of South Africa, this slow growing clumping cycad is considered one of the most admired of the African cycads; its species name of horridus means 'horrible' and hints of the experience with its foliage.

Horrible blue cycad...

Image of Encephalartos lehmanniana photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Karoo Cycad)

Architecturally handsome, the numerous sharp blue-green leaves of the Karoo cycad are stiff and held in an upright but slightly arching cluster atop a plump stem. Native to the hot, arid interior of the Eastern Cape of South Africa, this slow growing cycad is the cold hardiest and most drought tolerant of the African cycads.

Karoo cycad slowly forms a plump, upright, trunk-like stem that is beige. From the stem top is a circular rosette of upright blue-green leaves. Each stiff but curving leaf...

Image of Encephalartos manikensis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Gorongowe Cycad, Rhodesian Cycad)

Impressively elegant in stature, the frond-like leaves of Encephalartos manikensis are stiff and gently arching, with medium green leaflets. Native to rocky hillsides in the highlands of Zimbabwe and Mozambique, this slow growing cycad has a trunk-like, rounded stem that will slowly reach waist height.

At the top of the Gorongowe cycad's stem is a circular rosette of long dark green leaves. Each leaf frond is ornately lined with medium to dark green slightly prickly leaflets. The leaflets...

Image of Encephalartos senticosus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Lebombo Cycad, Xhosa)

Resembling a miniature date palm in appearance, the spiny, frond-like leaves of Encephalartos senticosus are stiff and upright, with dark green leaflets. Native to rocky slopes and cliffs in the Lebombo Range in northeastern South Africa, this slow growing cycad has a trunk-like, very thick stem that will slowly reach head-height.

At the top of the Lebombo cycad's stem is a circular rosette of long dark green leaves. Each leaf frond is ornately lined with medium to dark green leaflets...

Image of Encephalartos trispinosus photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Bushman's River Cycad)

Bushman's River cycad forms a suckering clump of plants over several decades. The stiff, frond-like leaves are gray to blue-gray and teem with numerous sharp leaflets and lobes. Native to the hot, sunny scrub and rocky ridges of the Eastern Cape of South Africa, this very slow growing clumping cycad is considered one of the most ornamental and cold-hardy of the African cycads.

The low, stem-like stump of this cycad holds five to seven leaves. Very old plants may be a multi-stumped clump. Each...

Image of Encephalartos woodii photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Wood's Cycad)

The numerous frond-like leaves of Encephalartos woodii are stiff and held outward and upright, with dark glossy green leaflets held on arching stems. Native to open, forested hillsides in South Africa, this relatively fast-growing, vigorous cycad often suckers at its base, producing a clump with great age. This species was discovered in 1895, and no female plants have ever been located.

The trunk-like stem of Wood's cycad is tan and thick, flaring out at the base when this tree-like...

(Canterbury Palm)

Prized for its elegant feather-duster crown and its colorful trunk, this small to medium-sized, single-trunked palm makes an excellent architectural plant for cool moist subtropical gardens. It comes from mountain slopes on Lord Howe Island, in the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand.

The evergreen, pinnate (feather-like) leaves arch from the apex of the slender but sturdy trunk, forming a plumy, domed crown. Each leaf has numerous rigid blade-shaped leaflets in two rows along a stout...