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Returned 3133 results. Page 198 of 314.

(Candy Stripe Western Azalea, Western Azalea)

An outstanding selection of the only azalea native to the western United States, 'Candy Stripe' opens its generous clusters of fragrant pink flowers in late spring and early summer. The flaring, trumpet-shaped flowers have a contrasting orange-yellow blotch on their upper lobes. This medium-sized to large deciduous shrub bears oval glossy-green leaves that turn yellow and red in fall. Western azalea prefers partial shade and highly organic acid soil that is evenly moist but well-drained. It tolerates...

Image of Rhododendron periclymenoides photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Pink Azalea, Pinxterbloom Azalea)

Just as the leaves begin to unfurl in spring, pinxterbloom azalea's spidery light pink flowers look like snowballs on the branches. One of the deciduous azaleas of the American East, from Massachusetts to Georgia, it grows in the highland forests. It is many-branched and forms an attractive, rounded but spreading shrub. The name "pinxterbloom" refers to Pentecost, the 40th day after Easter, making reference to its bloomtime in coldest regions or highest elevations.

Depending on climate, the rosy...

Image of Rhododendron poukhanense photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Korean Azalea)

Korean azalea is a low, dense, broad-growing, semi-evergreen shrub native to open grassy slopes in Korea. It bears small clusters of rose-pink to lavender-violet, fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers in early to mid-spring. The narrow, dark green-leaves turn vibrant shades of orange to red-purple in fall.

Gardeners prefer to plant the Korean azalea in full sun to partially shaded locations in a well-drained soil rich in organic matter. It works well in a woodland garden, mixed border or on an embankment....

Image of Rhododendron poukhanense

Mark A. Miller

(Compact Korean Azalea, Korean Azalea)

Korean azalea is a low, dense, broad-growing, semi-evergreen shrub native to open grassy slopes in Korea. It bears small clusters of rose-pink to lavender-violet, fragrant, funnel-shaped flowers in early to mid-spring. The narrow, dark green-leaves turn vibrant shades of orange to red-purple in fall.

Gardeners prefer to plant the Korean azalea in full sun to partially shaded locations in a well-drained soil rich in organic matter. It works well in a woodland garden, mixed border or on an embankment....

Image of Rhododendron prinophyllum photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Early Azalea, Roseshell Azalea)

The scent of cloves lifts from the pink blossoms of the Mayflower azalea in mid- to late spring as the new leaves emerge. This native of open woodlands, it hails from southern Quebec southward to Oklahoma and Virginia. Usually a rounded shrub in habit, this deciduous shrub can be quite variable in its mature shape and form. Full sun exposures produce the most compact, densest plants. Its excellent cold hardiness finds it a parent to the Northern Lights hybrid azaleas.

Fuzzy green leaves unfurl...

Image of Rhododendron prunifolium photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Plumleaf Azalea)

A delight for hummingbirds that venture into the woods, plumleaf azalea's fiery orange-red flowers occur in the dog days of summer. An upright deciduous shrub with spreading and open branching, it is native only to a handful of counties along the Georgia-Alabama border in the Chattahoochee River Valley of the southeastern United States. It is a federally endangered plant species.

Simple oval leaves grace the plant from spring to fall. In the warmth of mid- to late summer, trusses of tubular...

Image of Rhododendron schlippenbachii photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Royal Azalea)

Terrific in plant habit, late spring flowers and autumn color, royal azalea warrants inclusion in all gardens. Hailing from northeatern China and the Korean Peninsula, this deciduous shrub is many branches and forms a pleasant domed silhouette.

Just as the leaves emerge in late spring, clusters of three to six delicate pink blossoms don branch tips, releasing a sweet aroma. The deep green foliage clothes the plant across summer, being oval with textured veins. Then in autumn the leaves develop...

Image of Rhododendron serpyllifolium photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Wild Thyme Azalea)

Small oval leaves are tufted on the wiry stems of the wild thyme rhododendron, being in scale with its small, delicate pale pink blossoms in springtime. It is native to central and southern Japan. The thin stems on this slow-growing almost fully deciduous shrub are salmony brown with short brown bristles. The edges of the leaves also have minute hairs. Light pink blossoms are funnel-shaped and typically appear singly at the ends of branches above the leaves in mid-spring. The colder or longer the...

Image of Rhododendron serrulatum photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Hammocksweet, Swamp Azalea)

There are andromedotoxins in all parts of the rhododendron plant with associated health concerns. For more information visit: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/consumer/poison/Rhodosp.htm .

Image of Rhododendron vaseyi photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Pinkshell Azalea, Roseshell Azalea)

The beautiful pink blooms of Rhododendron vaseyi are one of the highlights of spring in its native western North Carolina. This deciduous azalea bears wide-flaring, funnel-shaped flowers with very short tubes. They cluster at or near the ends of the branches from early to mid-spring, before the leaves expand. The dark pink to white blooms often have contrasting steaks or speckles at the bases of their upper lobes. Open, irregularly upright plants bear medium green, slightly hairy, narrowly...