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Returned 3133 results. Page 199 of 314.

Image of Rhododendron vaseyi

Jesse Saylor

(Pinkshell Azalea, White Find Pinkshell Azalea)

The beautiful pink blooms of Rhododendron vaseyi are one of the highlights of spring in its native western North Carolina. This deciduous azalea bears wide-flaring, funnel-shaped flowers with very short tubes. They cluster at or near the ends of the branches from early to mid-spring, before the leaves expand. The dark pink to white blooms often have contrasting steaks or speckles at the bases of their upper lobes. Open, irregularly upright plants bear medium green, slightly hairy, narrowly...

Image of Rhododendron viscosum photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Clammy Azalea, Swamp Azalea, Swamp Honeysuckle)

Blooming in summer with rather humble white flowers, you'll likely notice the clove-like fragrance before you focus on the blossoms. This upright, rather open-formed deciduous shrub is native to the swamps of the eastern United States, from Maine to Alabama, and then westward to Texas. With time it forms thickets.

The many, sreading and uprgiht branches bear oval deep green leaves with a satiny luster and tiny hairs. In early summer, sticky-haired white flowers that resemble the floral tubes...

Image of Rhus aromatica photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Fragrant Sumac)

Fragrant sumac is a deciduous low, broad-spreading shrub whose branches turn up at the tips. Its fuzzy stems are fragrant when bruised and three-parted green leaves turn vivid shades of orange, yellow and red in fall. Small yellow flowers in spring give rise to dry red fruits in the fall, which attract birds. The cultivar 'Gro-Low' is a popular dwarf form of this dense shrub. Native to eastern North America, this fast growing, drought tolerant plant can be used as a ground cover or to hold steep...

Image of Rhus aromatica

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Fragrant Sumac, Gro-Low Fragrant Sumac)

Fragrant sumac is a deciduous low, broad-spreading shrub whose branches turn up at the tips. Its fuzzy stems are fragrant when bruised and three-parted green leaves turn vivid shades of orange, yellow and red in fall. Small yellow flowers in spring give rise to dry red fruits in the fall, which attract birds. The cultivar 'Gro-Low' is a popular dwarf form of this dense shrub. Native to eastern North America, this fast growing, drought tolerant plant can be used as a ground cover or to hold steep...

Image of Rhus copallinum photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Winged Sumac)

Fast growing and producing brilliant red fall foliage and edible small red fruits, the winged sumac is only suitable for spacious landscapes. This deciduous, suckering shrub to small tree is native to open woodlands and prairies to the eastern United States: from Maine to Michigan and Missouri, south to eastern Texas and the Florida panhandle. Short, crooked trunks and open branching develops on the winged sumac.

This plant is also called shining sumac because of its attractive glossy deep green...

Image of Rhus glabra photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Smooth Sumac)

Producing brilliant scarlet fall foliage and edible small red fruits, the smooth sumac is only suitable for spacious landscapes. This deciduous, bushy, suckering shrub to very small tree is native to sunny, dry lands all across North America: from the southern half of Canada to northeastern Mexico. It's the only tree/shrub species native to all of the contiguous United States. Leaning, crooked but beautiful trunks and open branching develops on the smooth sumac.

Distinguish this sumac species...

Image of Rhus integrifolia photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Lemonade Berry)

Here's a California native shrub sure to gain your admiration and curiosity. Lemonade berry produces sticky, hairy, salmon-red fruits that may be crushed and used to make a tasty beverage. This evergreen shrub (rarely ever a small tree) is native to the coastal scrub and chaparral habitats of extreme Southern California and into Mexico's Baja California. It naturally grows on cliffs, often exposed to salt spray and winds.

The leathery green leaves are attractive ovals, contrasting the gray bark....

Image of Rhus trilobata photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Skunkbush Sumac)

A low deciduous shrub that offers attractive flowers in spring and bright fruits and foliage in fall, skunkbush sumac is native to western North America. In mid-spring before the leaves emerge, conspicuous clusters of pale yellow flowers appear at the stem tips. Small berries follow, ripening red in late summer. Resembling poison ivy foliage, the downy three-lobed leaves are mildly glossy and medium to dark green. The leaflets have blunt-toothed edges. Bruised leaves release a malodorous scent....

Image of Rhus typhina photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Staghorn Sumac)

A common eastern North American shrub or small tree, staghorn sumac produces an umbrella-like crown of feathery foliage in summer that turns radiant shades of orange, red and yellow in fall. It is fully deciduous, very hardy and tends to spread forming large colonies over time. The staghorn reference in its common name refers to its stems and leaf petioles which have a fuzzy brown surface, much like that of deer antler velvet. Wild populations are common and tend to inhabit open forests and forest...

Image of Rhus typhina

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Staghorn Sumac, Tiger Eyes Sumac)

Very ornate, feathery yellow foliage is a hallmark of the Tiger Eyes staghorn sumac. Cultivar 'Bailtiger' also displays a handsome red fruit spike and yellow and orange fall color. A dwarf, upright but spreading shrub with a "flat top", it is native to much of eastern North America; this selection is a mutation of the cultivar 'Laciniata'.

Although the bark is smooth and sandy brown, younger twigs are more reddened with a brown fuzz. In late spring the chartreuse foliage appears. Leaves are...