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Returned 3133 results. Page 200 of 314.

Image of Rhus typhina

Mark Kane

(Staghorn Sumac)

Very ornate, feathery foliage is a hallmark of ‘Dissecta,’ a cutleaf staghorn sumac. Along with its feathery leaves it has handsome red fruit spikes at the tips of the branches and yellow and orange-red fall color. A deciduous, upright, colonizing, large shrub, it is native to much of eastern North America. It often looks like a multi-stemmed, flat-canopy small tree.

Although the bark is smooth and sandy brown, younger twigs are more reddened with a brown fuzz. In late spring the dark green leaves...

Image of Rhus typhina

Jesse Saylor

(Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac)

Large, ferny leaves comprised of many fine, deeply cut (laciniate) leaflets are the crowning glory of this more elegant cultivar of staghorn sumac. In fall, the deep green leaves of 'Laciniata' turn eye-catching shades of flaming red. The plants are slightly less vigorous than standard sumac, which is actually a benefit.

A common eastern North American shrub or small tree, staghorn sumac produces an umbrella-like crown of feathery foliage in summer that turns radiant shades of orange, red and...

Image of Ribes photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Currant)

Currants make excellent subjects for the ornamental or culinary garden. Deciduous and evergreen shrubs from the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere and the uplands of South America, they are most commonly grown for their small, spherical, often translucent berries, which are usually edible. The several-seeded fruits are black, red, green, yellow, or purple. Many currants are well worth growing for their showy clusters of small, four- or five-lobed, pink, white, red, or yellow flowers, which...

Image of Ribes alpinum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Alpine Currant)

Unlike its edible kin, gooseberries and currants, the Alpine currant, a native of Europe, is grown mostly as a hedge or specimen plant for its size, shape, glossy leaves and tolerance of pruning. It is a medium-sized, hardy deciduous shrub that with age has many branching stems and takes a spreading shape. It is dioecious (plants are either male or female) and the female plants have greenish yellow flowers of very little ornamental value. The leaves are green to dark-green, slightly lobed, toothy,...

Image of Ribes alpinum

Mark A. Miller

(Alpine Currant, Green Mound Alpine Currant)

Unlike its edible kin, gooseberries and currants, the Alpine currant, a native of Europe, is grown mostly as a hedge or specimen plant for its size, shape, glossy leaves and tolerance of pruning. It is a medium-sized, hardy deciduous shrub that with age has many branching stems and takes a spreading shape. It is dioecious (plants are either male or female) and the female plants have greenish yellow flowers of very little ornamental value. The leaves are green to dark-green, slightly lobed, toothy,...

Image of Ribes aureum photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Golden Currant)

Grown for its clove-scented flowers and its edible berries, this small to medium-sized deciduous shrub from central and western North America makes an excellent subject for the ornamental or culinary garden. Its showy drooping clusters of small, five-lobed, bright yellow flowers appear in mid- to late spring, and are visited by hummingbirds. Small, tart, juicy, several-seeded "currants" follow, ripening to black or yellow in mid- or late summer. The smooth, light green, three-lobed leaves turn purplish...

Image of Ribes aureum var. villosum photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Fragrant Golden Currant)

Grown for its clove-scented flowers and its edible berries, this small to medium-sized deciduous shrub from the central United States makes an excellent subject for the ornamental or culinary garden. Its showy drooping clusters of small, five-lobed, bright yellow flowers appear in mid- to late spring, and are visited by hummingbirds. Small, tart, juicy, several-seeded "currants" follow, ripening to black or yellow in mid- or late summer. The smooth, light green, three-lobed leaves turn purplish tones...

Image of Ribes californicum photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Hillside Gooseberry)

Grown for its intriguing winter flowers and edible berries, this small to medium-sized deciduous shrub from the coastal ranges of California makes an excellent subject for the native garden. Its small, five-lobed blooms appear in few-flowered clusters along the spiny branches in late winter, attracting hummingbirds. With their tubular white corollas and reflexed purple sepals, the blooms resemble tiny fuchsia flowers. Small, bristly, several-seeded "currants" follow, ripening to burgundy-red in late...

Image of Ribes cynosbati photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Eastern Prickly Gooseberry)

Sometimes grown in naturalistic gardens in its native eastern North America, this small spiny deciduous shrub bears few-flowered clusters of small, greenish, five-lobed blooms in spring. Small, bristly, several-seeded "currants" follow, ripening to burgundy-red in late summer. The edible fruits are favorites of birds and mammals. The medium-green, three- to five-lobed, maple-like leaves are smooth or downy.

This currant does best in partial shade and moist, well drained soil. Use it in naturalistic...

Image of Ribes odoratum photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Clove Currant)

Currants make excellent subjects for the ornamental or culinary garden. Deciduous and evergreen shrubs from the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere and the uplands of South America, they are most commonly grown for their small, spherical, often translucent berries, which are usually edible. The several-seeded fruits are black, red, green, yellow, or purple. Many currants are well worth growing for their showy clusters of small, four- or five-lobed, pink, white, red, or yellow flowers, which...