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Returned 3133 results. Page 54 of 314.

Image of Cotinus coggygria

Mark Kane

(Common Smokebush, European Smokebush, Purple Smoketree)

Purple smokebush or smoketree is a medium-sized, deciduous shrub to small tree that is native to regions from southern Europe to eastern China. The cultivar 'Purpureus' displays attractive purple foliage in spring that fades to green in summer and turns orange to red in autumn. In summer, large panicles of inconspicuous flowers appear followed by long, curled, densely-packed, hair-like fruits that look like large puffs of smoke. These are highly ornamental and are soft rosy-pink in color. Smokebush...

Image of Cotinus coggygria

James H. Schutte

(Common Smokebush, European Smokebush, Royal Purple Smokebush)

The fantastic 'Royal Purple' smokebush displays dark, dusty burgundy to purple leaves in spring and summer that turn crimson in autumn. These create the perfect background for its large puffs of burgundy purple smoke.

At its showiest, few shrubs are as pretty and effusive as the common smokebush. Its small flowers produce puffy ivory, pink or purple clouds of smoky fruits that persist for a couple of weeks before dissipating. It does not become too large and may be multi-trunked and shrubby or...

Image of Cotinus coggygria

Jessie Keith

(Common Smokebush)

Velvet cloak smokebush is a medium-sized, deciduous shrub to small tree that is native to regions from southern Europe to eastern China. This striking accent or specimen shrub has deep purplish rounded leaves that change to orange and red colors in the fall. In summer, large panicles of inconspicuous flowers appear followed by long, curled, densely-packed, hair-like fruits that look like large puffs of smoke. These are highly ornamental and purplish-red in color. 'Velvet Cloak' retains this leaf...

Image of Cotinus coggygria

James H. Schutte

(Common Smokebush, European Smokebush, Young Lady Smokebush)

Young lady smokebush is a medium-sized deciduous shrub that originates from regions in southern Europe to eastern Asia. This compact selection has a mounded habit and oval-shaped, medium green leaves that turn yellow, orange or red in the fall. In summer, it produces many large panicles of inconspicuous flowers followed by long, curled, densely-packed, hair-like fruits that look like large puffs of smoke. These are dusty purple-pink and highly ornamental.

Smokebush prefers sites with moderately...

Image of Cotoneaster photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Cotoneaster)

This Old World genus comprises approximately 80 species of deciduous and evergreen shrubs and small trees, several of which are popular garden subjects. Prostrate and trailing forms of Cotoneaster horizontalis, C. dammeri, C. apiculatus, and C. salicifolius are familiar and widely used groundcovers. Taller cotoneasters (such as C. multiflorus) are less common in landscapes, but are occasionally planted for their attractive...

Image of Cotoneaster acutifolius photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Peking Cotoneaster)

Peking cotoneaster is a deciduous shrub with an upright form and arching, sprawling branches decorated with small red fruits in fall. This Chinese native has small, oval, dull, dark-green leaves that turn red in fall. Young twigs are hairy and bloom with tiny white and light-pink flowers so numerous they make the branches look sprayed with flock. Black berries develop by the end of summer and persist into fall or early winter. The shrub always seems to be a great social gathering place for small...

(Hedge Cotoneaster, Peking Cotoneaster)

Hedge cotoneaster, native to Russian Siberia, is a deciduous shrub with an upright form, The glossy dark-green foliage turns red in the fall and the white or pale pink flowers appear in mid to late spring, followed by black berries in the fall that persist for months. Neither the flowers nor the berries are overly decorative, but en masse add interest to the plant.

This Cotoneaster is vigorous and grows best in well-drained soil and full sun. It is a tough, very cold hardy plant that is great...

Image of Cotoneaster adpressus photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Creeping Cotoneaster)

Creeping cotoneaster is among the finest of woody groundcovers, with its small, uniform, dark green leaves and contrasting, autumnal red berries. This deciduous, sprawling and spreading low shrub hails from western China, and will be evergreen in mild winter regions. The rigid, irregular branches are filled with tiny flowers in early summer. Upon close inspection, the petals are white with rosy edges, or vice-versa. Red fruits develop thereafter, deepening to a slightly dark red at the time in fall...

Image of Cotoneaster adpressus

James H. Schutte

(Creeping Cotoneaster)

Creeping cotoneaster is among the finest of woody groundcovers, with its small, uniform, dark green leaves and contrasting, autumnal red berries. This deciduous, sprawling and spreading low shrub hails from western China, and will be evergreen in mild winter regions. The rigid, irregular branches are filled with tiny flowers in early summer. Upon close inspection, the petals are white with rosy edges, or vice-versa. Red fruits develop thereafter, deepening to a slightly dark red at the time in fall...

Image of Cotoneaster apiculatus photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Cranberry Cotoneaster)

Introduced from its native western China in 1919, cranberry cotoneaster is a clump-forming deciduous shrub with a low spreading habit. It bears pink flowers in early summer followed by cranberry-sized red fruit in the fall. Along with the autumn fruit display, this plant’s leaves turn ablaze with red, red-purple and bronze color. Its stems are purple-red and when broken, smell of maraschino cherries.

Cranberry cotoneaster is less troubled with disease and insects than other cotoneasters and...