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Plants Matching shrub

Returned 3133 results. Page 80 of 314.

(Pineapple Guava)

Pineapple guava is a large, evergreen shrub grown as an ornamental and for fruit. It is native to the subtropical regions of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. The plant is usually grown with multiple stems which arise close to the ground, though it can be pruned into a standard or small tree. The leaves are leathery, elliptical to egg shaped, opposite each other on the stems, dark to olive green on the upper surface and silver from dense hairs on the lower surface. Flowers appear spring and...

(Desert Olive, New Mexican Forestiera)

For arid regions of the western United States, this native deciduous shrub makes a fine hedge in lieu of more thirsty exotics. It is found in a variety of plant communities from the California chaparral to New Mexico’s pinyon-juniper lands. This large, upright, densely branched shrub bears small oblong gray-green leaves along its smooth gray or tan stems. The leaves turn yellow in fall. Unpruned specimens may reach the height of a small tree, but plants may be trimmed to a more compact size. The...

Image of Forsythia photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Forsythia)

Forsythias are harbingers of spring, beloved for their early, prolific display of brilliant yellow blooms. The genus Forsythia is comprised of about 11 species, one from southeastern Europe the rest from eastern Asia. This genus was named in honor of William Forsyth, one of the founders of the organization that went on to become the Royal Horticulture Society. He never saw his namesake plants, as the first Forsythia was named several decades after his passing.

These upright,...

Image of Forsythia

Mark A. Miller

(Forsythia, Little Renee Forsythia)

Forsythias are harbingers of spring, beloved for their early, prolific display of brilliant yellow blooms. The genus Forsythia is comprised of about 11 species, one from southeastern Europe the rest from eastern Asia. This genus was named in honor of William Forsyth, one of the founders of the organization that went on to become the Royal Horticulture Society. He never saw his namesake plants, as the first Forsythia was named several decades after his passing.

These upright,...

Image of Forsythia

James H. Schutte

(Meadowlark Forsythia)

Forsythia blooms are harbingers of spring with masses appearing on branches usually before the leaves. 'Meadowlark' is a deciduous hybrid of early forsythia, native to Korea, and Albanian forsythia, native to Europe, and is grown for its extreme tolerance to cold. The leaves are leathery, oval-shaped with a sharply pointed tip; the margins may be smooth or toothed. The leaf color is dark green turning purple or gold in the fall. The flowers are brilliant yellow with petals attached to a tube and...

Image of Forsythia

Jesse Saylor

(Forsythia, New Hampshire Gold Forsythia)

Blooming reliably in areas that are too cold for most forsythias, this compact cultivar bears an abundance of sunny blooms very early in the gardening season. It derives from a cross between Korean forsythia and the forsythia hybrid 'Lynwood'.

The oval, serrated, medium-green leaves of this deciduous shrub are paired along upright to slightly arching stems. The leaves often assume purplish tints in fall. Masses of bright yellow flowers line the stems in late winter and early spring, before the...

Image of Forsythia

Jesse Saylor

(Forsythia, Northern Gold Forsythia)

Blooming reliably in areas that are too cold for most forsythias, this upright, medium-sized shrub announces spring with an abundance of sunny flowers. Introduced in 1979 by Agriculture Canada, 'Northern Gold' derives from a 1962 cross between Forsythia ovata 'Ottawa' and F. europaea.

The oval, serrated, yellowish green leaves of this deciduous shrub are paired along erect to slightly arching branches. The leaves often assume maroon tints in autumn. The funnel-shaped,...

Image of Forsythia

John Buettner

(Forsythia, Northern Sun Forsythia)

Blooming reliably in areas that are too cold for most forsythias, this upright, medium-sized shrub announces spring with an abundance of sunny flowers. Deriving from a cross between Korean forsythia and Albanian forsythia, 'Northern Sun' was introduced by the University of Minnesota in 1983.

The oval, serrated, medium green leaves of this deciduous shrub are paired along erect to slightly arching branches. The leaves may assume reddish purple tints in autumn. The funnel-shaped, four-petaled,...

(Early Forsythia)

Forsythia blooms are harbingers of spring with masses appearing on branches usually before the leaves and early forsythia is the earliest of them all. It is native to Korea, deciduous and has medium-sized leaves which are leathery, oval-shaped with a sharply pointed tip and toothed margins. The leaf color is green turning purple or gold in the fall. The flowers are borne singly in the leaf axils and are bold yellow with petals attached to a tube; they appear in later winter to early spring. The flowers...

(Early Forsythia, Tetragold Early Forsythia)

Forsythia blooms are harbingers of spring with masses appearing on branches usually before the leaves and Tetragold early forsythia is among the earliest of them all with larger than normal flowers. It is native to Korea, deciduous and has medium-sized leaves which are leathery, oval-shaped with a sharply pointed tip and toothed margins. The leaf color is green turning purple or gold in the fall. The flowers are borne singly in the leaf axils and are bold yellow with petals attached to a tube; they...