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Plants Matching tender perennial

Returned 2941 results. Page 105 of 295.

Image of Dracaena marginata

James H. Schutte

(Colorama Dracaena, Madagascar Dragon Tree)

Tufts of pointed leaves atop distinctly chevron-marked stems define the alien-looking Dragon Tree. Native to Madagascar, Dracaena marginata is the classic houseplant for most locations. Very cold sensitive, dragon tree is grown in the landscape in only the warmest regions. The leaves are long, linear, narrow, attached to the stem without a stalk. The cultivar ‘Colorama’ has green leaves with red-pink stripes on the margins, midrib and either side of the midrib.The stems or trunks usually are un-branched...

(Cape Sundew, Sundew)

Native to marshes and other damp habitats in southwestern South Africa, this evergreen herbaceous perennial is a favorite of collectors of carnivorous plants.

This tender perennial produces rosettes of pale green to red, spatula-shaped leaves that are held on long broad stalks. The upper surface of each leaf blade is lined with stout, red or purple, glandular hairs, each bearing a drop of dew-like resin at the tip. The hairs snare and digest small insects. The leaf rosettes arise from underground...

Image of Dyckia photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Dyckia)

Agave-like in appearance, these terrestrial bromeliads are grown for their evergreen rosettes of saw-toothed leaves and their colorful spires of tubular flowers. All of the approximately 120 Dyckia species are native to rocky, low- to mid-altitude habitats in central South America.

The, fleshy, spiny-edged, lance-shaped leaves of these terrestrial bromeliads are borne in solitary or colonizing rosettes. Rosettes vary widely in size and form, from small, low, and spidery to massive...

Image of Dyckia

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Dyckia)

Succulent in its rigid, spined leaves, this arid bromeliad resembles a perfectly shaped aloe. This hybrid has Dyckia platyphylla in its lineage, and forms a perfectly domed rosette that eventually multiplies into a large thicket-cluster of plants.

Each leaf of 'Carlsbad' is a wide and long lance and emanates outward from the center. Colored a glossy medium to bright, the leaf edges are sharply teethed and the underside is pale gray-green. In summer's warmth, mature plants send up a tall...

Image of Dyckia

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Dyckia)

Blend cherry red color with the deep brown of Coca-Cola and you'll understand why this hybrid cultivar of dyckia received its name. This cross between Dyckia platyphylla and Dyckia 'Carlsbad' forms a spidery rosette that eventually multiplies into a large cluster of plants.

Each leaf is a long pointed lance and emanates outward from the center. Colored a glossy dark red to olive-green, the leaf edges are sharply teethed and the underside is a dull gray. In summer's warmth, mature...

Image of Dyckia brevifolia photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Sawblade)

Cute and rounded, the rosette of this dryland succulent bromeliad truly looks like a miniature aloe. Native to northern Argentina and southern Brazil, sawblade forms a rounded rosette that eventually suckers, multiplying into a large, low mounding cluster of plants.

Each short leaf is a rigid but water-storing spear. Medium to bright green, the leaf edges are evenly lined with tiny silvery white teeth. In summer's warmth, mature plants send up a tall flower spike that reveals many small lemon...

Image of Dyckia encholirioides photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Dyckia)

This bromeliad will definitely fool you, since you'll be determined to call it a species of agave. A large and handsome plant, the highland dyckia hails from central and southern Brazil and adjacent northeastern Argentina. Its leaves are rigid and will curl and bend as needed for best reception of sunlight. This bromeliad usually is in a loose cluster of two to three others, flopping and twisting in the rocky outcroppings where it grows.

Leaves are long and lined in small spines. Medium green...

Image of Dyckia fosteriana photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Dyckia)

Beautiful in is unfriendly, spined foliage, Foster's dyckia is a tropical arid bromeliad that is worth growing, truly one of the finest of all in the genus Dyckia. Native to southeastern Brazil, it forms a perfect, tight rosette that eventually multiplies into a dense, mounded cluster with scores of plants.

The narrow leaves are silvery green and are both arching and curved as they radiate out from the plant center. The edges are scalloped and lined with tiny teeth that are lighter silvery...

Image of Dyckia marnier-lapostollei photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Dyckia)

Wild imagination? Admire this bromeliad long enough and you'll become creative director for a production of "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" or "Little Shop of Horrors". Native to southern Brazil, Dyckia mariner-lapostollei has architecturally magnificent leaves, although hardly monstrous in size. Many consider this the most beautiful species of Dyckia and it slowly multiplies to form a small clump of plants.

Fat and wide, each lance-like leaf often recurves and twists and has...

Image of Dyckia platyphylla photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Dyckia)

Perhaps you'll think you have encountered an interesting new species of aloe or century plant when you first see the multi-colored, spiny leaves of this arid bromeliad. Native to eastern Brazil, Dyckia platyphylla forms a spreading rosette that eventually multiplies into a massive, mounded cluster of plants.

Each leaf is a long triangle and emanates outward from the center. Colored a glossy deep green, the leaf edges are sharply teethed and blush a brownish bronze. The undersides are...