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Plants Matching tender perennial

Returned 2941 results. Page 89 of 295.

Image of Cryptanthus photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Cryptanthus, Earth Star)

Brazilian in origin, Cryptanthus comprises approximately 50 species. Earth stars are largely terrestrial (ground dwelling) ornamentals that have been highly bred, so there are thousands more hybrid cultivars. They tend to be low-growing and many have a spreading habit, so these tropical evergreens tend to be grown as colorful groundcovers. In the wild, they inhabit rainforest floors, so they are most adapted to partial sun or shade.

Cryptanthus are comprised of colorful foliar...

Image of Cryptanthus

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Cryptanthus)

Brazilian in origin, Cryptanthus comprises approximately 50 species. Earth stars are largely terrestrial (ground dwelling) ornamentals that have been highly bred, so there are thousands more hybrid cultivars. They tend to be low-growing and many have a spreading habit, so these tropical evergreens tend to be grown as colorful groundcovers. In the wild, they inhabit rainforest floors, so they are most adapted to partial sun or shade.

Cryptanthus are comprised of colorful foliar...

Image of Cryptanthus

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Cryptanthus)

Brazilian in origin, Cryptanthus comprises approximately 50 species. Earth stars are largely terrestrial (ground dwelling) ornamentals that have been highly bred, so there are thousands more hybrid cultivars. They tend to be low-growing and many have a spreading habit, so these tropical evergreens tend to be grown as colorful groundcovers. In the wild, they inhabit rainforest floors, so they are most adapted to partial sun or shade.

Cryptanthus are comprised of colorful foliar...

Image of Cryptanthus bivittatus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Earth Star, Earthen Star)

As if painted, the variegated stripes on earths tar's foliage resembles an ackward starfish, adding visual texture to the floor of the tropical dappled shade garden. A tender terrestrial (growing in soil) bromeliad with a stemless rosette of leaves, it is from eastern Brazil.

There are from ten to twenty flattened strap-like leaves that have tiny teeth on their wavy edges and taper to a point. A medium green, they are striped in either ivory or pink tones, with colors changing across the growing...

(Earthen Star, Stripe Star)

Wavy foliage that resembles an ackward starfish, stripe star adds visual texture to the tropical dappled shade garden. A tender terrestrial (growing in soil) bromeliad with a stemless rosette of leaves, it is from Brazil.

There are from eight to fifteen flattened strap-like leaves that have tiny teethed edges and taper to a point. A medium green, they have waxy but matte finish with wavy edges and lighter green or ivory stripes; modern selections have more ornate tones of silver, bronze, red...

Image of Cryptanthus bromelioides var. tricolor photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Stripe Star, Tricolor Earthen Star)

With varigated wavy-edged foliage that resembles an ackward starfish with rosy center, Tricolor stripe star adds visual texture to the tropical dappled shade garden. A tender terrestrial (growing in soil) bromeliad with a stemless rosette of leaves, it's from Brazil.

There are many flattened strap-like leaves that have tiny teethed edges and taper to a point. A light green, they are waxy but matte finished with wavy edges and ivory stripes with hints of pink. At leaf bases, there is an intensified...

Image of Cryptanthus zonatus photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Zebra Plant, Zebra Star)

The zigzag white stripes across zebra earth star's leaves add visual interest to shaded tropical gardens. This terrestrial (soil growing) bromeliad produces starry rosettes of leaves that hug the ground. The species is Brazilian in origin but wild populations are believed to be extinct. In fact wild Cryptanthus zonatus plants were last recorded in 1972 in Dois Irmãos State Park, Pernambuco, Brazil.

Each rosette produces eight to fifteen flattened, tapered, strap-like leaves with tiny...

Image of Cuphea

PlantHaven

(Ballistic Cigar Flower, Hybrid Cigar Plant)

Compact and mounding, Firecraker cigar flower is a hybrid tender tropical perennial to shrub with abundant tubular flowers that are pinkish red, purple and white. This hybrid was developed by Terence Keogh in Queensland, Australia by crossing Cuphea ignea with Cuphea lanceolata. In the warmth from late spring until autumn, the colorful tubular blossoms appear in loose clusters along the outer reaches of the stems, attracting hummingbirds.

Full sun to no less than partial sun...

Image of Cuphea

James H. Schutte

(David Verity Cigar Flower, Hybrid Cigar Plant)

A plethora of orange-red, tubular "cigar-like" flowers with yellow tips clothe ‘David Verity’ through the hottest summer months. Hummingbirds love the bright blooms of this heat and drought tolerant gem and its lush green leaves and red stems provide added beauty and tropical looks. It’s no wonder this tropical subshrub has gained fast popularity as a bedding plant.

Broad and bushy, ‘David Verity’ cigar plant is covered with small, crisp, medium green leaves with lighter midveins. Its numerous...

Image of Cuphea

James H. Schutte

(Firecracker Cigar Flower, Hybrid Cigar Plant)

The vigorous cigar flower, ‘Firecraker’, has a trailing habit and bears loads of frilly, deep scarlet flowers with purple centers when summer’s at its hottest. In tropical to subtropical zones it will grow as a semi-evergreen subshrub but in colder regions it’s planted as a bedding annual. This hybrid is a cross between Cuphea ilavea and Cuphea purpurea and was hybridized in 1999 by German plant breeder, Michael Helmet Unger.

The reddish stems of ‘Firecracker’ are hairy, glandular...