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Returned 1346 results. Page 125 of 135.

(Redwood)

Remarkably fast growth and a silvery cast to the foliage make 'Simpson’s Silver' one of the most distinctive new cultivars of coastal redwood. Its parent species is the tallest tree in America and a popular evergreen for landscaping. Made famous by its red, rot-resistant wood, redwood is native to the Pacific Coast of northern California, with some groves extending into Oregon. It prefers the rainy cool weather of the coastal ranges but tolerates inland summers, if irrigated. This pyramidal evergreen’s...

Image of Sequoiadendron giganteum photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Giant Sequoia)

Bigtree is the giant drought resistant redwood with a world record for the largest trunk circumference. Though often confused, the narrow coastal species is taller, thinner, more pointed and darker green than this one. Bigtree is found in just a small area on middle elevation west slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The region experiences snow in winter and long dry summers. In the wild as in gardens, this tree demands absolute drainage.

The prickly foliage of the bigtree is bushier than...

Image of Sequoiadendron giganteum

Maureen Gilmer

(Giant Sequoia, Weeping Giant Sequoia)

This is a weeping cultivar of giant sequoia (or Bigtree), the drought-resistant redwood with a world record for the largest trunk circumference. Though often confused, the narrow coastal redwood is taller, thinner, more pointed and darker-green than this one. Bigtree is found in just a small area on middle elevation west slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The region experiences snow in winter and long dry summers. In the wild as in the garden, this tree demands absolute drainage.

The cultivar...

Image of Sophora japonica photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Chinese Scholartree, Japanese Pagoda)

Japanese pagoda (also known as Styphnolobium japonicum) is a large deciduous tree native to China but cultivated in Japan for hundreds of years. It is an upright, broad-spreading tree that grows as wide as it does tall, forming a lacy canopy of dark green, pinnate leaves. Fluffy pyramidal panicles, or clusters, of creamy white-green, fragrant flowers appear in summer, followed by green "pea pods". Leaves turn yellow in fall, but are not considered consistently ornamental. Its younger branches...

Image of Sophora japonica

Jesse Saylor

(Weeping Japanese Pagoda)

Japanese pagoda (also known as Styphnolobium japonicum) is a large deciduous tree native to China but cultivated in Japan for hundreds of years. It is an upright, broad-spreading tree that grows as wide as it does tall, forming a lacy canopy of dark green, pinnate leaves. Fluffy pyramidal panicles, or clusters, of creamy white-green, fragrant flowers appear in summer, followed by green "pea pods". Leaves turn yellow in fall, but are not considered consistently ornamental. Its younger branches...

Image of Sophora secundiflora photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Texas Mountain Laurel)

The mescal bean or Texas mountain laurel is one of the most elegant of all evergreen desert trees with its lush green foliage and wisteria-like blossoms. Despite its beauty this is a tough species native to the Southwest U.S. and northern Mexico. It dwells in low, hot locations to middle mountain elevations, showing a wide range of adaptability. However, these trees require extreme summer heat to be truly vigorous plants. This slow-growing shrubby tree develops a wide-spreading canopy with numerous...

Image of Sorbus

Jesse Saylor

(Hybrid Mountain Ash)

Named for the color of its showy berry-like fruits, this hybrid of European mountain ash grows into a handsome small deciduous tree. Its lush ferny bright green leaves turn orange and red tones in fall. Musky-scented dull white flowers in late spring, clusters of apricot-yellow fruits in late summer and fall, and cherry-like gray-brown bark with conspicuous horizontal pores give it further multi-seasonal interest. The berries are favored by birds.

Grow ‘Apricot Lady' in almost any moist, well-drained,...

Image of Sorbus

Jesse Saylor

(Hybrid Mountain Ash)

Named for the color of its showy berry-like fruits, this hybrid of European mountain ash grows into a handsome small deciduous tree. Its lush ferny bright green leaves turn orange and red tones in fall. Musky-scented dull white flowers in late spring, clusters of pale pink fruits in late summer and fall, and cherry-like gray-brown bark with conspicuous horizontal pores give it further multi-seasonal interest. The berries are favored by birds.

Grow ‘Kirsten Pink' in almost any moist, well-drained,...

Image of Sorbus

Jesse Saylor

(Hybrid Mountain Ash)

Named for the color of its showy berry-like fruits, this hybrid of European mountain ash grows into a handsome small deciduous tree. Its lush ferny bright green leaves turn orange and red tones in fall. Musky-scented dull white flowers in late spring, clusters of coral-pink fruits in late summer and fall, and cherry-like gray-brown bark with conspicuous horizontal pores give it further multi-seasonal interest. The berries are favored by birds.

Grow ‘Rowancroft Coral Pink' in almost any moist,...

Image of Sorbus americana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(American Mountain Ash, Mountain Ash)

A striking sight from late summer into winter when its branches are laden with dense clusters of showy fruit, this exceptionally cold-hardy large shrub (or small tree) from eastern North America is also worth growing for its handsome ferny foliage. Divided into 11 to 19 toothed, lance-shaped leaflets, the feathery deciduous leaves are medium green before turning orange or yellow in fall. Flattish heads of dull white flowers open in late spring, giving rise to pea-sized fruits which ripen red. The...