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Returned 1346 results. Page 129 of 135.

Image of Tamarix ramosissima photo by: JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

(Saltcedar)

Despite its beautiful soft pink blossoms, this plant is among the most banned of all invasive exotics. In the Southwestestern U.S., the agricultural success of tamarisk trees as windbreaks has turned into an ecological tragedy. This species, native over a huge part of Asia Minor, has the potential to naturalize in many climates and disturb native plant communities throughout arid regions.

This species reproduces easily from seed. It has proven to be highly competitive with desert natives and may...

Image of Tamarix ramosissima

Jesse Saylor

(Saltcedar)

Despite its beautiful soft pink blossoms, this plant is among the most banned of all invasive exotics. In the Southwestestern U.S., the agricultural success of tamarisk trees as windbreaks has turned into an ecological tragedy. This species, native over a huge part of Asia Minor, has the potential to naturalize in many climates and disturb native plant communities throughout arid regions.

This species reproduces easily from seed. It has proven to be highly competitive with desert natives and may...

Image of Taxodium distichum photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Bald Cypress)

A mature bald cypress is a wonderfully regal tree. This tall, upright, deciduous conifer has exquisitely soft, delicate needles that look feathery along its tiered branches. It is naturally distributed in low, moist locations across much of the central and eastern United States. Mature specimens develop a broad pyramidal habit and become very large.

In spring, its bare branches become covered with soft, compound needles that are bright spring green. These darken by summer and turn a gorgeous...

Image of Taxodium distichum

Mark A. Miller

(Cascade Falls Bald Cypress, Weeping Bald Cypress)

A compact, weeping form of the normally tall and upright bald cypress, 'Cascade Falls' makes a unique specimen because of it foliage and stature. This cultivar boasts exquisitely soft, delicate needles that look feathery along its cascading branches. The bald cypress is naturally distributed in low, moist locations across much of the central and eastern United States. 'Cascade Falls' was discovered growing in a lakeside garden in a suburb of Auckland, New Zealand. It does not produce cones or seeds,...

Image of Taxodium distichum

Mark A. Miller

(Bald Cypress, Peve Minaret Bald Cypress)

A mature bald cypress is a wonderfully regal tree. 'Peve Minaret' differs from the norm by producing a candelabra-shaped canopy and maturing much smaller. This dwarf deciduous conifer has exquisitely soft, delicate needles that look feathery along its upward-angled branches. Bald cypress is naturally distributed in low, moist locations across much of the central and eastern United States. Mature specimens develop a neat pyramidal habit.

In spring, the bare branches become covered with soft, compound...

Image of Tecoma stans photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Esperanza , Yellow Trumpetbush)

The delicate beauty of this heavy blooming shrub hides its cast iron constitution. Yellow trumpetbush can stand up to the worst heat of the low deserts and the humidity of the tropics. Its only limitation is sensitivity to extreme cold. The broad range of this native spans the Americas, from the arroyos of New Mexico and Arizona southward to Argentina. Unlike other desert plants, which have silver or blue gray foliage, this shrub bears lush dark green leaves.

In mild climates it may bloom...

Image of Tectona grandis photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(East Indian Oak, Teak)

One of the most prized tropical, decay-resistant lumbers, aromatic teak wood is yellow to olive-green when first cut, but curing to a golden brown. Native to lowland, equatorial forests of Southeast Asia, teak develops into a tall, upright tree with an oval habit. The soft bark is deeply grooved and grayish tan, peeling off in strips.

Teak leaves are very large, broad ovals of a rich medium green. One leaf blade may be as long as an arm. They feel like felt or sandpaper, especially on their...

Image of Theobroma cacao photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Cacao, Chocolate, Cocoa)

Divine in name, foliage beauty and in the delicious flavor of its seeds, the chocolate tree or cacao is a tropical understory tree met with smiles and curious eyes wherever it is encountered. A small tree with irregular crown that becomes umbrella-like at maturity, this broadleaf evergreen tree is native to Mexico and Central America. The botanical name Theobroma translates into "food of the gods", and was first cultivated, revered and used by the Aztec and Mayan peoples.

Young leaves...

Image of Thuja

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Giant Arborvitae, Green Giant Arborvitae, Western Arborvitae, Western Red Cedar)

Vigorous and adaptable, Green Giant arborvitae is a popular United States National Arboretum introduction. This tall, evergreen tree is a hybrid between Thuja standishii and Thuja plicata. It is a fast grower, has deep green foliage, a neat pyramidal habit and few pest or disease problems.

Adaptable to most moderately drained soil types, 'Green Giant' requires full sun and lots of space to grow. It is ideal to mass as a screen and makes a pleasing specimen tree in the landscape....

(Night Princess Flower)

Deep purple flowers poke out from fuzzy reddish buds in summer and autumn on the night princess flowe. The vibrant blooms look almost electric against the gray-green hairy leaves that are often flushed with tones of red. A small evergreen tree or shrub from southeastern Brazil, this species is densely branched and develops a rounded habit with age.

The oval leaves of this princess flower are medium to dark green and covered in many short gray hairs. Once mature, the leaves may develop a reddish...