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Returned 1346 results. Page 25 of 135.

Image of Alnus cordata photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Italian Alder)

Glossy heart-like leaves and the persistent brown seed fruits make Italian alder a great shade tree with multi-season interest and grace. An upright deciduous tree that does not get too wide, it hails from southern Italy and Corsica. Its barks becomes light gray-sandy brown with shallow fissures and small plates, often blotched.

In early spring this tree flowers. The male flowers are in drooping, finger-like clusters called catkins and are yellow-green. The female flower are small and red and...

Image of Alnus glutinosa photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(European Alder)

Black alder is a medium-sized, fast-growing, deciduous tree native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, but has naturalized in other regions including the northeastern and central United States. It bears handsome, glossy, dark-green leaves from spring to fall, and its catkins provide mild interest in winter and early spring.

Requiring sun but thriving in most soils, it excels as a shade or screening tree in sites that are too damp or barren for other trees. It may be invasive in some...

Image of Alnus glutinosa

Jesse Saylor

(Cutleaf European Alder)

Black alder is a medium-sized, fast-growing, deciduous tree native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, but has naturalized in other regions including the northeastern and central United States. It bears handsome, glossy, dark-green leaves from spring to fall, and its catkins provide mild interest in winter and early spring.

Requiring sun but thriving in most soils, it excels as a shade or screening tree in sites that are too damp or barren for other trees. It may be invasive in some...

Image of Alnus glutinosa ssp. betuloides photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(European Alder)

Black alder is a medium-sized, fast-growing, deciduous tree native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, but has naturalized in other regions including the northeastern and central United States. It bears handsome, glossy, dark-green leaves from spring to fall, and its catkins provide mild interest in winter and early spring.

Requiring sun but thriving in most soils, it excels as a shade or screening tree in sites that are too damp or barren for other trees. It may be invasive in some...

Image of Alnus incana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Thinleaf Alder)

Ranging from a large shrub to a medium sized tree, thinleaf alder has red and golden pendent flowers (catkins), green and gray foliage and persistent fruit nutlets and smooth bark that make it interesting even in winter. A deciduous large shrub to small tree depending on severity of winter or availability of soil moisture, this species is native to Europe and the Caucausus as well as in North America from California to Canada and across the northern United States. The bark is usually smooth and gray,...

Image of Alnus incana

Jesse Saylor

(Golden Thinleaf Alder)

Ranging from a large shrub to a medium sized tree, golden thinleaf alder has red and golden pendent flowers (catkins), yellow-green foliage and persistent fruit nutlets and smooth bark that make it interesting even in winter. A deciduous large shrub to small tree depending on severity of winter or availability of soil moisture, this species is native to Europe and the Caucausus as well as in North America from California to Canada and across the northern United States. The bark is usually smooth...

Image of Alnus incana

Jesse Saylor

(Weeping Thinleaf Alder)

Ranging from a large shrub to a medium sized tree, weeping thinleaf alder has red and golden pendent flowers (catkins), deep green foliage and persistent fruit nutlets and smooth bark that make it interesting even in winter. A deciduous large shrub to small tree depending on severity of winter or availability of soil moisture, this species is native to Europe and the Caucausus as well as in North America from California to Canada and across the northern United States. It is an upright tree with drooping...

Image of Alnus japonica photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Japanese Alder)

Glossy green leaves and the persistent brown seed fruits make Japanese alder a great shade tree with a broad adaptability to landscape soils and moisture. A pyrimad-shaped deciduous tree that does not get too wide, it hails from Japan, Korea and China's Manchuria. Its barks becomes light gray-sandy brown with shallow fissures.

In early spring this tree flowers. The male flowers are in drooping, finger-like clusters called catkins and are yellow-brown. The female flower are small and purplish...

Image of Alnus rhombifolia photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(White Alder)

White alder is a large, fast growing, short-lived, deciduous tree native to the western United States. It bears glossy, nearly diamond-shaped, dark green leaves from spring to fall. Its catkins provide mild interest from winter and early spring. White alder grows best in sites with full sun but also excels as a shade tree. It thrives in most soils and grows will in sites that are too damp or barren for many other trees.

Image of Alnus rubra photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Oregon Alder, Red Alder)

Glossy dark green leaves with red veins, platy gray bark and the persistent brown seed fruits make red alder a great shade tree with beauty and landscape adaptability, including salty soil. Native to extreme western Canada southward into Oregon and California in the United States, it's a vigorous, cone-chaped deciduous tree. Its bark becomes ghostly gray-sandy brown that cracks into flat plates. The inner bark will turn red when exposed to air.

In early spring this tree flowers before leaves...