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Returned 1346 results. Page 29 of 135.

Image of Beaucarnea recurvata photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Bottle Palm, Ponytail Palm)

Heat and drought are no problem for this tough plant. Ponytail palm is a tall, palm-like plant that is not a true palm but is closely related to agave. It has an upright, fleshy, trunk-like stem that becomes swollen at the base, where is stores water. This is topped with clusters of long, curved, sword-shaped leaves that hang down giving the appearance of a pony’s tail. When mature, it produces panicles of fragrant cream colored flowers that are pollinated by bats.

Ponytail palm thrives in hot...

Image of Beaucarnea recurvata

James Burghardt

(Ponytail Palm, Variegated Ponytail Palm)

Heat and drought are no problem for this tough plant. Ponytail palm is a tall, palm-like plant that is not a true palm but is closely related to agave. It has an upright, fleshy, trunk-like stem that becomes swollen at the base, where is stores water. This is topped with clusters of long, curved, sword-shaped leaves that hang down giving the appearance of a pony’s tail. When mature, it produces panicles of fragrant cream colored flowers that are pollinated by bats.

Ponytail palm thrives in hot...

(Birch, Crimson Frost Birch)

Not only does the attractive white bark dazzle year 'round, the Crimson Frost birch provides magnificent burgundy-red to purple foliage from spring to autumn. This cultivar is a hybrid, derived from a cross between Betula platyphylla var. szechuanica and B. pendula ‘Purpurea’. It attains a rather narrow, pyramidal habit at maturity.

In early spring, drooping flower clusters called catkins dangle from the naked branches. Male and female flowers occur in separate catkins...

Image of Betula albosinensis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Chinese Red Birch)

A rather large deciduous tree that has a rounded to conical habit, the Chinese red birch is mainly grown for its ornamental bark. Bark ranges from pinkish brown to copper or orange-red and peels away in thin sheets, revealing a smooth white to gray underlayer. The outer bark layer also is covered in a white powdery bloom, especially when young. This plant is native to central and western China.

In early spring tiny flowers appear in pendulous catkins that droop from the branches. The leaves emerge...

Image of Betula alleghaniensis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Yellow Birch)

A metallic amber-brown bark that peels away is the all-season highlight of the yellow birch. This deciduous tree is dense and cone-shaped in its youth, eventually maturing with a rounded to irregular habit after three decades. Yellow birch is native to the cool, moist soils of eastern North America.

The dull, dark green leaves are pointed ovals with fine teeth on the margins. Leaf undersides are a lighter shade. In early spring, just as leaves emerge, catkins don the branches. Male catkins are...

Image of Betula lenta photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Sweet Birch)

Attaining a rounded but broad, spreading canopy when mature, the sweet or cherry birch is renowned for its attractive reddish bark. The bark becomes scaled and charcoal gray with age and lenticels dot the bark, much like that seen on cherry trees. The deciduous sweet birch tree is native to much of eastern North America, with adjunct populations in the cooler, higher elevations of the American Southwest.

The satin-gloss to matte green leaves are pointed ovals with fine teeth on the margins. Leaf...

Image of Betula mandshurica photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Manchurian Birch)

A beautiful, upright, white-barked deciduous tree, this native of Northeast Asia is known in gardens primarily by its variety japonica. The single or sometimes branched trunk is clad in chalky, milk-white bark, giving it year-round interest. Attractive elongated pores (lenticels) decorate the trunk and branches. The relatively large, triangular, toothed leaves alternate along dark brown twigs. The leaves turn yellow in autumn. The foliage tends to emerge in early spring, making it vulnerable...

Image of Betula mandshurica var. japonica photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Japanese White Birch)

A beautiful, upright, white-barked deciduous tree, this native of Japan is the most widely grown variety of Manchurian birch. The single or sometimes branched trunk is clad in chalky, milk-white bark, giving it year-round interest. Attractive elongated pores (lenticels) decorate the trunk and branches. The relatively large, triangular, toothed leaves alternate along dark brown twigs. The leaves turn yellow in autumn. The foliage emerges later in spring than that of typical Manchurian birch, making...

Image of Betula maximowicziana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Monarch Birch)

Pretty bark, massive leaves and excellent/reliable golden fall foliage color are prized attributes of the monarch birch. This rather fast-growing deciduous tree is native to Russia's Kurile Islands and Japan. It has an open habit when young but becomes quite stiff and upright - more so than other birch species - at maturity.

Monarch birch's bark is orange or pink-tinged bark that becomes grayish white. It peels away in horizontal strips. Another key identification feature are the leaves. They...

Image of Betula nigra photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(River Birch)

River birch is a handsome, often multi-stemmed, fast growing tree that is native to the central and southeastern United States. Its most notable ornamental feature is its beautiful peeling bark that appears in mixed shades on white, rust-orange, gray and brown. Like other birches, it has elongated catkins, which appear in spring, and its medium-green leaves turn a dirty yellow in the fall. Its seeds ripen in late spring, much earlier than other birch species.

This tree is a wise selection for...