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Returned 1346 results. Page 32 of 135.

(Gray Birch, Whitespire Gray Birch)

After thirty years of trials, 'Whitespire' has proven to be quite resistant to the bronze birch borer that plagues its parent species, the grey birch. The parent hails from New England into Nova Scotia, inhabiting large tracts of forest, but also growing in association with swamps, bogs, streams and other wetlands. The upright trunk of ‘Whitespire’ is typically single, with horizontal branches and beautiful whitish bark streaked with gray markings, an eye-catching sight in winter when the tree is...

(Himalayan Birch)

Himalayan birch is a pyramidal, deciduous tree native from the Himalayas into southern China. A variable plant in height, habit, and bark color, it is best known for its variable white-barked selections, which provide year-round interest with their attractive, chalk-white bark. Throughout summer it has crisp, dark green leaves that turn yellow in fall. Himalayan birch prefers full sun or light shade and reasonably fertile, well-drained soil. In the landscape, it is best enjoyed as a specimen tree....

Image of Betula utilis var. jacquemontii photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Whitebarked Himalayan Birch)

White-barked Himalayan birch is a pyramidal, deciduous tree native from the Himalayas into southern China. Best known for its striking chalk-white bark, which provides year-round interest, it also features dark green leaves which turn yellow in fall. Several cultivars are available to include 'Grayswood Ghost', which has superior clean white bark and yellow fall color. Himalayan birch prefers full sun or light shade and reasonably fertile, well-drained soil. It works well as a specimen plant or in...

Image of Bidens aristosa photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bearded Beggarticks)

Pretty foliage and bright yellow, daisy-like flowers in summer and fall makes every gardener covet the bearded beggarticks. However, a copious production of two-pronged seeds that resemble ticks, readily snag in a pet's coat or on your pant legs. For this reason, this species warrants control to prevent rampant colonization across a landscape. Even though attractive in bloom, some people will always regard this wildflower as a weed.

Bearded beggarticks is a fast-growing annual native to the...

(Beggarticks)

Almost every child, puppy and kitten has carried and dispersed the seeds of Bidens. Variously known as beggarsticks, sticktights, Spanish needles and bur marigolds these annoying seeds are the product of sweet, daisy-like flowers.

There are about 200 species of herbs, shrubs or vines which make up the genus Bidens. They are annuals or perennials and can be found growing throughout much of the world, most often in subtropical, tropical, and temperate North America and South...

Image of Bombacaceae photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Bombax Family)

The bombax family comprises some 30 genera and 250 species of tropical and subtropical trees, many native to arid or semi-arid regions. Closely allied to the Malvaceae (mallow family), members of the Bombacaceae are distinguished primarily by their imposing stature, their bundled (or "fascicled") stamens, and their smooth (rather than spiny) pollen. Many have swollen, bulbous, light-wooded trunks rich in water-storing tissue. These make striking but ultimately massive ornamental trees for tropical...

Image of Bombax photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cotton Tree)

The bombax family comprises some 30 genera and 250 species of tropical and subtropical trees, many native to arid or semi-arid regions. Closely allied to the Malvaceae (mallow family), members of the Bombacaceae are distinguished primarily by their imposing stature, their bundled (or "fascicled") stamens, and their smooth (rather than spiny) pollen. Many have swollen, bulbous, light-wooded trunks rich in water-storing tissue. These make striking but ultimately massive ornamental trees for tropical...

Image of Bombax ceiba photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Cotton Tree, Red Kapok, Red-silk-cotton Tree)

This large, spiny, buttress-trunked deciduous tree has long been cultivated for its showy red flowers and fiber-filled seedpods. It is native to arid river valleys and open woodlands from India to northern Australia.

The spreading branches of this tropical tree are lined with large, hand-shaped, long-stemmed leaves, each with five to seven oval leaflets. The huge, waxy, red to orange-red blooms open from plump green buds in late winter and early spring, a week or two before the leaves emerge....

Image of Brachychiton acerifolius photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Australian Flame Tree, Flame Bottle Tree, Illawarra Flame Tree)

Australian flame tree has maple-like foliage that drops in time to reveal naked branches lined with thousands of red flowers in late spring and summer. An upright but rounded semi-evergreen to fully deciduous tropical tree, it eventually forms a plump green trunk when mature. The bark becomes ghostly light gray with age. This showy tree is native to the forests of Queensland and New South Wales, Australia.

Following the dry winter, the bare gray-green branches bear thousands of small flowers...

Image of Brachychiton discolor photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Bush Kurrajong, Pink Flame Tree, Queensland Lacebark)

A stately silhouette of spreading branches atop a bottle-shaped trunk makes the Queensland lacebark attractive even when the rose-colored flowers are absent. Native to the dry forests and coastal scrub of northeastern Australia, the tree has smooth green bark and a pyramidal shape when young. With age, the bark becomes cracked and gray, and the tree's canopy a bit more muscular and spreading. Tap the trunk and it sounds hollow, although packed with fibers.

The tree tends to drop leaves during...