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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 13

Returned 2908 results. Page 101 of 291.

Image of Dyckia

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Dyckia)

Succulent in its rigid, spined leaves, this arid bromeliad resembles a perfectly shaped aloe. This hybrid has Dyckia platyphylla in its lineage, and forms a perfectly domed rosette that eventually multiplies into a large thicket-cluster of plants.

Each leaf of 'Carlsbad' is a wide and long lance and emanates outward from the center. Colored a glossy medium to bright, the leaf edges are sharply teethed and the underside is pale gray-green. In summer's warmth, mature plants send up a tall...

Image of Dyckia

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Dyckia)

Blend cherry red color with the deep brown of Coca-Cola and you'll understand why this hybrid cultivar of dyckia received its name. This cross between Dyckia platyphylla and Dyckia 'Carlsbad' forms a spidery rosette that eventually multiplies into a large cluster of plants.

Each leaf is a long pointed lance and emanates outward from the center. Colored a glossy dark red to olive-green, the leaf edges are sharply teethed and the underside is a dull gray. In summer's warmth, mature...

Image of Dyckia brevifolia photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Sawblade)

Cute and rounded, the rosette of this dryland succulent bromeliad truly looks like a miniature aloe. Native to northern Argentina and southern Brazil, sawblade forms a rounded rosette that eventually suckers, multiplying into a large, low mounding cluster of plants.

Each short leaf is a rigid but water-storing spear. Medium to bright green, the leaf edges are evenly lined with tiny silvery white teeth. In summer's warmth, mature plants send up a tall flower spike that reveals many small lemon...

Image of Dyckia fosteriana photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Dyckia)

Beautiful in is unfriendly, spined foliage, Foster's dyckia is a tropical arid bromeliad that is worth growing, truly one of the finest of all in the genus Dyckia. Native to southeastern Brazil, it forms a perfect, tight rosette that eventually multiplies into a dense, mounded cluster with scores of plants.

The narrow leaves are silvery green and are both arching and curved as they radiate out from the plant center. The edges are scalloped and lined with tiny teeth that are lighter silvery...

Image of Dyckia marnier-lapostollei photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Dyckia)

Wild imagination? Admire this bromeliad long enough and you'll become creative director for a production of "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" or "Little Shop of Horrors". Native to southern Brazil, Dyckia mariner-lapostollei has architecturally magnificent leaves, although hardly monstrous in size. Many consider this the most beautiful species of Dyckia and it slowly multiplies to form a small clump of plants.

Fat and wide, each lance-like leaf often recurves and twists and has...

Image of Dyckia platyphylla photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Dyckia)

Perhaps you'll think you have encountered an interesting new species of aloe or century plant when you first see the multi-colored, spiny leaves of this arid bromeliad. Native to eastern Brazil, Dyckia platyphylla forms a spreading rosette that eventually multiplies into a massive, mounded cluster of plants.

Each leaf is a long triangle and emanates outward from the center. Colored a glossy deep green, the leaf edges are sharply teethed and blush a brownish bronze. The undersides are...

Image of Dyckia remotiflora photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Dyckia)

Hooked leaves on this rosetted plant may find you calling it an aloe, but not so fast! Native to Uruguay and southern Brazil, Dyckia remotiflora forms a dense rosette that eventually multiplies into a rounded cluster of plants.

Each leaf is a long curving spear, emanating outward from the center. Satin-glossed and dark green, the spines on the leaf margins are silvery, as are the leaf undersides which are covered in scales. In late spring, mature plants send up a short, branched flower...

Image of Dypsis cabadae photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Cabada Palm)

Grown for its ornamental trunks and large lacy leaves, this medium-sized palm was once native to Madagascar but is now found only on the Comoros Islands. It was first described from cultivated plants in Cuba. The slender, multiple trunks of Cabada palm are light olive green, ringed at regular intervals with gray leaf scars. Each trunk is topped by a long smooth silvery green crownshaft, formed by the clasping leaf stems ("petioles"). The six to ten magnificent, erect to horizontal, pinnate (feather-like)...

Image of Dypsis decaryi photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Triangle Palm)

Named for its three vertical ranks of pinnate (feather-like), gracefully arching, blue-green fronds, this amazingly beautiful and interesting single-trunked palm is native only to the southeastern part of Madagascar. Branching clusters of yellow flowers arise from the lower leaf bases throughout the year, followed by small green fruit that ripen to black.

Triangle palm thrives in sun, well-drained soil that is not highly alkaline, and mild climates. Although drought tolerant, it responds favorably...

Image of Dypsis leptocheilos photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Redneck Palm, Teddy Bear Palm)

Named for the unique color and texture of its clasping leaf stems, teddy bear palm is widely grown in gardens, but unknown in the wild. It probably originated in Madagascar. Medium-sized and single-trunked, it bears magnificent long pinnate (feather-like) leaves in feather-duster fashion, giving it the appearance of a straight-trunked coconut palm.

The waxy silver-gray trunk is ringed at regular intervals with red-brown leaf scars. The trunk is topped by a fuzzy, reddish-brown crownshaft, formed...