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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 13

Returned 2908 results. Page 105 of 291.

Image of Eragrostis curvula photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Weeping Lovegrass)

The clump-forming weeping lovegrass has fine, grassy blades that arch and droop and produces many tall stems of feathery flowers in late summer. This warm-season perennial grass hails from East Africa, so it is tough and tolerant of heat and drought.

Though native to a semi-tropical area, weeping lovegrass is usually fully deciduous but can remain semi-evergreen in fully frost-free climates. Its neat clumps of elegant foliage appear in spring. Airy panicles of lavender-gray flowers bloom in...

Image of Eremophila maculata var. flava photo by: John Rickard

John Rickard

(Yellow Emu Bush, Yellow Spotted Emu Bush)

An evergreen shrub native to the mainland of Australia, spotted emu bush is tolerant of heat, drought, light freezes and tropical humidity. In fact, its generic name Eremophila literally means "desert loving." This species is best known for its narrow, gray-green leaves, and tubular flowers of red, yellow, orange or pink, with white spotted throats. Height and habit are as variable as flower color, so it pays to choose a cultivar with a known characteristics.

When the new leaves first...

Image of Eria merrillii photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Eria, Orchid)

Eria merrillii is an epiphytic (tree-dwelling) orchid grown for its attractive leaves and its many-flowered clusters of small white blooms. Also known as Eria ovata and Pinalia ovata, it is native to warm humid lowland forests from the Ryuku Islands to Borneo and New Guinea.

This evergreen perennial forms clumps of erect, fleshy, cane-like pseudobulbs, each topped by four to five leathery, lance-shaped leaves. Long clusters of whitish, somewhat unpleasantly scented...

Image of Escobaria photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Escobaria)

This genus of small cacti contains about 17 species often confused with those of Mamnillaria and Coryphantha because the two groups are quite similar in size and spination. They all originate in the same regions of the desert Southwest into northern Mexico with a single species found only in Cuba. Escobaria enjoys a much larger range extending northward into southern Canada.

The low growing globular plants occur alone or clustered, with stems becoming elongated with...

Image of Escobaria missouriensis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Missouri Foxtail Cactus, Yellow Pincushion Cactus)

This genus of small cacti contains about 17 species often confused with those of Mamnillaria and Coryphantha because the two groups are quite similar in size and spination. They all originate in the same regions of the desert Southwest into northern Mexico with a single species found only in Cuba. Escobaria enjoys a much larger range extending northward into southern Canada.

The low growing globular plants occur alone or clustered, with stems becoming elongated with...

Image of Escobaria vivipara photo by: Barbara Beasley, US Forest Service

Barbara Beasley, US Forest Service

(Arizona Beehive, Arizona Spinystar, Bisquit Cactus, Showy Pincushion)

This genus of small cacti contains about 17 species often confused with those of Mamnillaria and Coryphantha because the two groups are quite similar in size and spination. They all originate in the same regions of the desert Southwest into northern Mexico with a single species found only in Cuba. Escobaria enjoys a much larger range extending northward into southern Canada.

The low growing globular plants occur alone or clustered, with stems becoming elongated with...

Image of Eucalyptus deglupta photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Mindanao Gum, Rainbow Gum)

King of the ornamental barks, rainbow gum lives up to its name with exfoliating strips of bark in an array of colors from green and blue to red, orange and brown. A tall, very fast-growing evergreen tree from southeastern Asia (eastern Indonesia to New Guinea and the Phlippines), is also bears wispy clusters of fragrant white blossoms that are adored by honeybees. It attains an upright form with a V-shape but gently rounded canopy.

The foliage and stems are fragrant when crushed as they are filled...

Image of Eucharis amazonica photo by: International Flower Bulb Centre

International Flower Bulb Centre

(Amazon Lily, Eucharist Lily)

Glorious in foliage and in blossom, this bulbous perennial from moist forests of northwestern South America is renowned for its fragrant white flowers and broad evergreen leaves.

The glossy, dark green, hosta-like leaves of this tender perennial arise from a large, shallow-growing, tunic-covered bulb. Domed clusters of four to eight nodding, sweet-scented white flowers are borne on knee-high, leafless stalks ("scapes") in mid to late summer, and again in winter if warmth and moisture are sufficient....

Image of Eucharis x grandiflora photo by: TL

TL

(Amazon Lily, Hybrid Eucharist Lily)

Glorious in foliage and in blossom, this bulbous perennial from moist forests of northwestern South America is renowned for its fragrant white flowers and broad evergreen leaves.

The glossy, dark green, hosta-like leaves of this tender perennial arise from a large, shallow-growing, tunic-covered bulb. Clusters of two to six nodding, sweet-scented white flowers are borne on leafless stalks ("scapes") in late spring or summer, and again at other seasons if warmth and moisture are sufficient....

Image of Euphorbia ammak photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Spurge)

This remarkable tree-sized, branching succulent is a coveted landscape plant in arid, frost free regions. Originating from Saudi Arabia and Yemen, it is common in southern Africa where it was introduced long ago by traders, but is now listed as a threatened species in its native habitat.

Forming a branched, candelabra-like outline, this thorny succulent superficially resembles a cactus, but is not actually related to them. Its needle-like barbs are borne on vertical ridges that divide its...