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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 13

Returned 2908 results. Page 11 of 291.

Image of Alocasia princeps

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Malaysian Elephant Ear)

Beautiful purple leaves with purple stems are the shining glory of Alocasia princeps ‘Purple Cloak.’ This taro is a tropical elephant ear native to the forested regions of Malaysia. This tall, evergreen perennial is grown for its large, arrow-shaped, or sagittate, leaves. Each has two basal lobes that extend beyond the point where the stem attaches at the leaf's edge. Throughout the year, it produces anthurium-like flowers with a finger-like floral column (spadix) surrounded by a pale green...

Image of Alocasia reginula photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Elephant Ear)

Borne along a short stout creamy white stem, the broad oval stiff-textured leaves are velvety dark green with sunken, silver veins and purple undersides. They have two prominent rounded lobes at their base. The ivory white leaf stalks attach to the interior rather than the edge of the leaf blades. Small anthurium-like blooms on short stalks appear sporadically in the leaf axils. They consist of a finger-like floral column (spadix) surrounded by a white petal-like leaf (spathe). This plant is self-sterile,...

Image of Alocasia sanderiana photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Kris Plant)

Kris plant is a lovely tropical perennial native to the Phillipines. Its unusually glossy and deeply lobed, slender, v-shaped leaves have dramatically waved edges. The leaves are accentuated by its broad silver green midrib and thin outline. During the growing season creamy white spathe flowers do appear but are generally overshadowed by foliage.

Kris plant prefers full to moderate shade and protection from scorching sun rays. It requires moist organic-rich soil, with enough drainage to allow...

Image of Alocasia x amazonica

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Amazon Taro, Polly African Mask, Polly Taro)

With a more compact form and strudier foliage, Polly African mask has dark leaves with curvaceous edges and silvery veins. It is a frost tender tropical hybrid elephant ear parented by Alocasia watsonia and A. sanderiana. Loved for its large glossy, leathery, and green-black arrowhead leaves, the two pointed lobes and the wavy edges make 'Polly' look like an exotic African tribal mask. These edges are accentuated with a silvery pale green outline and midrib. During the growing...

Image of Aloe cameronii photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cameron's Ruwari Aloe, Red Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe capitata photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Head Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe dichotoma photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Kokerboom, Quiver Tree)

This succulent tree aloe becomes a living work of art as it matures. It is suited to frost free gardens in regions with dry summers, such as southern California, and originates from South Africa in open country that lacks true trees. Wild plants can form colonies and attract weaverbirds that hang their pendulous nests from the branches.

The trunk-like stem of this aloe is smooth, lightly striated and tan. Branches form towards the top and support clusters of foliage. The fleshy, lance-shaped,...

Image of Aloe ferox photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Cape Aloe)

The largest and most ferocious looking of all aloes, cape aloe is incredibly elegant in the garden. This grand species from South Africa is variable, with plants in the wild showing a marked change in thorn density. This frost tender rosette of large, fleshy blue-green leaves bears thorns not only at leaf edges but generously studding smooth surfaces as well. Leaves do take on a pink and red coloring during the winter. Cape aloe blooms in spring bearing a large, heavily branched spike tipped with...

Image of Aloe harlana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe maculata photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Soap Aloe)

A small, stemless, suckering aloe from drylands of southern Africa, this succulent evergreen is valued for its ornamental leaves, compact dense habit, and showy flowers. Broadly lance shaped, light- to dark-green leaves with oblong white speckles and brown-toothed margins are borne in ground-hugging rosettes that spread to form large dense clumps. In late spring and summer they give rise to dense heads of drooping tubular flower on branched knee-high stems. Adapted for pollination by sunbirds, the...