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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 13

Returned 2908 results. Page 118 of 291.

Image of Guzmania

James H. Schutte

(Guzmania, Omer Morobe Guzmania, Torch Bromeliad)

Glossy and spineless, the cream, green and rose-variegated foliage of 'Omer Morobe' is accentuated with a long-lasting fuchsia-magenta floral stem topped in gold. A shade-requiring, tender tropical perennial epiphyte (grows upon another plant for support), this cultivar is a hybrid derived from plants with origins in Tropical America.

The variegated leaves are wide straps with a glossy sheen, pink blush, and are thin and flexible. They are arranged in a rosette that forms a reservoir, or vase,...

Image of Guzmania

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Guzmania, Ostara Guzmania, Torch Bromeliad)

Spineless glossy leaves punctuated with a long-lasting bright scarlet to orange-red floral stem, 'Ostara' is a showy shade-loving bromeliad. A tender tropical perennial epiphyte (grows upon another plant for support), this cultivar is a hybrid derived from Guzmania witmackii and Guzmania lingulata, both native to Tropical America.

The leaves are wide straps with a glossy sheen and are thin and flexible. They are arranged in a rosette that forms a reservoir, or vase, in which...

Image of Guzmania

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Guzmania, Pink Day Guzmania, Torch Bromeliad)

Spineless glossy leaves punctuated with a long-lasting floral stalk of vibrant hot pink-magenta, 'Pink Day' is a showy shade-loving bromeliad. A tender tropical perennial epiphyte (grows upon another plant for support), this cultivar is a hybrid derived from plants with origins in Tropical America.

The leaves are wide straps with a glossy sheen and are thin and flexible. They are arranged in a rosette that forms a reservoir, or vase, in which rainfall and leaf litter can collect to provide the...

Image of Guzmania

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Guzmania, Techno Guzmania, Torch Bromeliad)

Spineless glossy leaves punctuated with a long-lasting floral stalk of scarlet-magenta, 'Techno' is a showy shade-loving bromeliad. A tender tropical perennial epiphyte (grows upon another plant for support), this cultivar is a hybrid derived from plants with origins in Tropical America.

The leaves are wide straps with a glossy sheen and are thin and flexible. They are arranged in a rosette that forms a reservoir, or vase, in which rainfall and leaf litter can collect to provide the nourishment...

Image of Guzmania

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Guzmania, Torch Bromeliad, Violet Queen Guzmania)

Spineless glossy leaves punctuated with a long-lasting floral stalk of red-violet, 'Violet Queen' is a showy shade-loving bromeliad. A tender tropical perennial epiphyte (grows upon another plant for support), this cultivar is a hybrid derived from plants with origins in Tropical America.

The leaves are wide straps with a glossy sheen and are thin and flexible. They are arranged in a rosette that forms a reservoir, or vase, in which rainfall and leaf litter can collect to provide the nourishment...

Image of Guzmania lingulata photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Tongue-leaved Guzmania, Torch Bromeliad)

Spineless glossy leaves in a rosette punctuated with a long-lasting floral stem lined with showy red, pink or yellow bracts describes tongue-leaved guzmania. A tender tropical perennial epiphyte (grow upon another plant for support), this species is native from the West Indies southward into Brazil. Across its range it is quite variable, as some have variegated foliage and others have pink bracts. It has be used for breeding and is a primary parent for many of the variously colored guzmanias widely...

Image of Hamelia patens photo by: Carol Cloud Bailey

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Firebush, Scarletbush)

Across its native range of South Florida, the Caribbean and Tropical Americas, this sun-loving evergreen produces clusters of red floral tubes with yellow-orange centers, on red stems from spring through early fall. Its leaves are broad and fuzzy and produces bluish-black berries after a long bloom season. Butterflies frequent the flowers and songbirds enjoy the fruits for a meal.

Firebush performs best in full sun but is shade tolerant and will adequately grow in any soil provided that there...

Image of Handroanthus chrysanthus photo by: José Reynaldo da Fonseca, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

José Reynaldo da Fonseca, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

(Golden Tabebuia, Golden Trumpet Tree)

Bright yellow flowers that rival the sun for attention fill the bare branches on the golden trumpet tree. This large-growing deciduous tree is native from Mexico southward to Venezuela and Peru, including along the coast of Ecuador. This species is known to bloom simultaneously across a region, creating magnificent displays across the countryside. Depending on latitude and elevation, flowering is most concentrated from late winter to early spring. The golden trumpet tree develops an upright, irregular...

Image of Handroanthus heptaphyllus photo by: João de Deus Medeiros, Flickr Contributor

João de Deus Medeiros, Flickr Contributor

(Pink Tabebuia, Pink Trumpet Tree)

Valued as a timber tree, pink trumpet tree gives the added bonus of producing a fantastic spring flowering display. It's a semi-deciduous tree native to the dry coastal forests across the Caribbean. It's a very close relative to the ipe (Handroanthus impetiginosus). This slow-growing tree develops an upright oval habit. The bark is smooth and gray-brown.

The leaves are compound, resembling hands with five leaflets. Leaflet edges are always lined with tiny teeth. The foliage is rich green...

Image of Handroanthus impetiginosus photo by: Mauroguanandi, Flickr Contributor

Mauroguanandi, Flickr Contributor

(Ipê, Lavender Trumpet Tree, Purple Tabebuia)

Ipê explodes into fantastic bloom by very early spring, rivaling a magnolia or cherry tree in beauty and visual presence. It's a deciduous tree native to the highlands of Mexico and extends far south into Argentina. Across this expansive area of distribution, the plant is quite variable in habit. Always slow growing, ipê may become a multi-trunked shrub or solitary-stemmed upright tall tree. The bark is smooth and gray-brown. In very old tall trees the trunk may become buttressed, with an irregular...