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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 13

Returned 2908 results. Page 119 of 291.

Image of Handroanthus serratifolius photo by: Mauroguanandi, Flickr Contributor

Mauroguanandi, Flickr Contributor

(Golden IpĂȘ, Surinam Greenheart, Yellow Poui)

A massive tree of the tropical rainforest, the Surinam greenheart or golden ipe provides a showy display of yellow trumpet-shaped flowers anytime from midwinter to late spring. This semi-evergreen, rarely fully deciduous tree is native to northern South America, from the Caribbean coast southward into Bolivia and central Brazil. Slow growing, it becomes a towering tree with a buttressed trunk. Its bark is thinly corky and a warm sandy brown.

The compound leaves look like large hands, with five...

Image of Handroanthus umbellata photo by: Carol Cloud Bailey

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Golden Tabebuia, Golden Trumpet Tree)

One of the most cold-hardy trumpet trees, this species is becoming increasing endangered across its rainforest habitat in Brazil. A small to medium size tree, nearly evergreen in tropical climes but more deciduous in chillier winter areas, the golden trumpet tree is prized for its yellow flower display in late winter or early spring. The tree is moderate in growth pace, attaining an open, rounded canopy with spreading branches.

The leaves are compound and shaped like a hand. Five smooth-edged...

Image of Hardenbergia violacea

John Rickard

(Australian Sarsaparilla , Purple Coral Pea, Vine Lilac)

The vigorous and heavy-flowering 'Happy Wanderer' has lovely violet-purple blooms and is larger than the standard lilac vine. This tough evergreen vine has rich green foliage that beautifully compliments its elongated clusters of tiny, purple, pea-shaped flowers. Australian in origin, vine lilac naturally exists as a twining vine or rambling, shrubby groundcover.

Leathery foliage of rich green covers the plants year round. The leaves are oval to lance-shaped and often lustrous. As the winter...

Image of Hatiora gaertneri photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Holiday Cactus)

The holiday cactus is named for the season of its bloom as well as its luminescent red or magenta flowers which make it a popular gift plant. It is a unique species native to the jungles of southern Brazil. Natural populations are epiphytic, which means plants live in the trees. They prefer the crotches between tree branches where organic matter and moisture accumulate. Its preferred habitat is similar to that of many orchids.

The foliage of this succulent is much like that of a typical Christmas...

Image of Hatiora salicornioides photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Dancing Bones Cactus, Drunkard's Dream)

Hatiora salicornioides is a shrubby, epiphytic (tree-dwelling) cactus with spineless, upright to arching, pencil-thin stems. The stem segments resemble tiny bottles, hence the common name "drunkard's dream." This popular houseplant is native to tropical forests of southeastern Brazil, where it grows in the angles of tree branches and on rock ledges.

The leafless, freely branching, olive-green stems of this cactus are divided into many segments. The stems ascend and then arch, giving...

Image of Haworthia photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Haworthia)

Comprising about 70 species of small, succulent, cold-tender perennials, this southern African genus contains many excellent subjects for containers or frost-free gardens. Most cultivated haworthias come from arid or semi-desert regions of South Africa that receive little or no summer rainfall.

Most Haworthia species form ground-hugging or short-stemmed rosettes of fleshy, somewhat triangular, firm- or soft-textured leaves. The leaves of several species (including H. cymbiformis)...

(Rough-spined Haworthia)

A leathery, fleshy rosette with ivory, spider leg-like spines describes the rough-spined haworthia. A frost-tender perennial succulent, it is native to the Western Cape province of South Africa. It grows in arid habitats, usually protected from intense sun rays under the branches of shrubs. Rough-spined haworthia slowly develops into a small cluster of rosettes after many years.

The rosette comprises dozens or scores of pointed succulent green leaves. Each is lined with white to tan, sparse spines...

Image of Haworthia arachnoidea var. xiphiophylla photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Haworthia, Rough-spined Haworthia)

A leathery, fleshy rosette with ivory, spider leg-like spines describes the rough-spined haworthia. A frost-tender perennial succulent, it is native to the Western Cape province of South Africa. It grows in arid habitats, usually protected from intense sun rays under the branches of shrubs. Rough-spined haworthia slowly develops into a small cluster of rosettes after many years.

The rosette comprises dozens or scores of pointed succulent green leaves. Each is lined with white to tan, sparse spines...

Image of Haworthia attenuata photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Haworthia, Zebra Plant)

The zebra plant produces rosettes of pointy green leaves with bumpy, raised white bands. It resembles an ocean anemone or sea urchin. This frost tender, succulent perennial is native to the southeastern cape of South Africa. It develops into a clump with numerous small rosettes connected by fleshy, fibrous roots.

The succulent, rigid, upright leaves are triangular in cross-section. Bumpy ridges (comprised of numerous tubercles) occur in bands on the outsides of the leaves in the rosette. Only...

Image of Haworthia attenuata var. radula photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Haworthia, Silver Zebra Plant)

The silver zebra plant produces numerous tiny white spots on its upright green leaves, making them look silvery green. It also resembles an ocean anemone or urchin found in a coral reef. This frost-tender, succulent perennial is native to a small area to the west of Port Elizabeth in southern South Africa. It develops into a clump containing numerous small rosettes with a fibrous root system.

The rigid, upright leaves are slightly longer and more slender than those of the standard zebra plant,...