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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 13

Returned 2908 results. Page 210 of 291.

Image of Neomarica caerulea photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Giant Apostle's Iris, Walking Iris)

Interesting, fragrant, royal blue iris flowers decorate the walking iris from late summer to spring. Native to Brazil, this tender perennial is popular for tropical beds and greenhouses. It is very easy to grow and propagate. It grows and spreads from underground stems or rhizomes, and plantlets form at the end of the flower stems after blooming. As the plantlets grow in size and weight, the stems bend down to the ground and they root.

Walking iris is clump-forming and its leaves are broad,...

Image of Neomarica caerulea

James Burghardt

(Giant Apostle's Iris, Walking Iris)

Extra large, richly colored, fragrant flowers distinguish the versatile walking iris ‘Regina.’ Native to Brazil, this tender perennial is popular for tropical beds and greenhouses. It is very easy to grow and propagate. It grows and spreads from underground stems or rhizomes, and plantlets form at the end of the flower stems after blooming. As the plantlets grow in size and weight, the stems bend down to the ground and they root.

Walking iris is clump-forming and its leaves are broad, sword-shaped...

Image of Neoregelia

Mark A. Miller

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

Deep burgundy-red leaves are the most ornamental feature of the hybrid bromeliad, 'Dexter's Pride'. This semi-epiphytic perennial resulted from complex hybridization among several species and cultivars of Neoregelia. It was developed and named in 1950 by Floridian bromeliad collector, Mulford Foster. This selection thrives in areas that are moist, humid and warm. New plantlets arise on stolons from the central "mother" plant and replace it as the central plant slowly dies after blooming.

The...

Image of Neoregelia

Pao Delal

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

A rather petite bromeliad with wine red leaves and random bands and blotches of yellow-green, 'Dr. Oeser' is a highly variable hybrid bromeliad. This semi-epiphytic perennial resulted from various mutations in seeds harvested from Neoregelia chlorosticta and was named prior to 1976. It was created by the German bromeliad breeder, Dr. Richard Oeser. It thrives in areas that are moist, humid and warm. New plantlets arise on stolons from the central "mother" plant and replace it as the central...

Image of Neoregelia

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

Rapid growth, lots of plantlets and deep burgundy-red leaves are the main features of the hybrid bromeliad, 'Fireball'. It's among the most reliable bromeliads for full sun tropical gardens. This semi-epiphytic perennial has unknown genetic origins, and was sent from Brazil to American bromeliad enthusiasts in 1960. It thrives in areas that are moist, humid and warm. New plantlets arise on stolons from the central "mother" plant and replace it as the central plant slowly dies after blooming. A stemmed...

Image of Neoregelia

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

Long-lasting pink blush over the green and buttery yellow striped leaves highlight the ornamental qualities of the Franca hybrid bromeliad. This semi-epiphytic perennial was selected by Chester Skotak in 1991 as a seedling resulting from a controlled breeding program in Costa Rica. Bright, humid and warm conditions favor good growth of 'Franca'. Numerous new plantlets arise on stolons from the main "mother" plant and replace it as it slowly dies several months after blooming.

The low, starfish-like...

Image of Neoregelia

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

A semi-epiphytic, hybrid tropical perennial, 'Grace' arose from breeding of bromeliads native to South America. Glossy green leaves dominate, but the center of the plant rosette turns bright rose when the plant blooms in late spring or early summer. Bright, humid and warm conditions favor good growth of 'Grace'. New plantlets arise on stolons from the main "mother" plant and replace it as it slowly dies months after blooming.

The flat, starfish-like rosette of this bromeliad comprises a radial...

Image of Neoregelia

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

Plump rosettes of glossy, smooth leaves that turn vibrant coral-magenta make the Magali hybrid bromeliad a showstopper. This semi-epiphytic perennial was the result of controlled hybridization efforts by Grant Groves of Orlando, Florida. Parent plants were cultivar 'Lila' and Neoregelia carolinae 'Meyendorfii'. Bright, humid and warm conditions favor good growth of 'Magali'. New plantlets arise on stolons from the main "mother" plant and replace it as it slowly dies after blooming.

The...

Image of Neoregelia

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

Dark green leaves with numerous light yellow longitudinal stripes of the Margaret hybrid bromeliad are masked by intense wine and red blushing during the intense light and warmth of summer. A semi-epiphytic, hybrid tropical perennial, 'Margaret' arose from breeding of bromeliads native to South America. Bright, humid and warm conditions favor good growth. New plantlets arise on stolons from the main "mother" plant and replace it as it slowly dies months after blooming.

The rounded, open rosette...

Image of Neoregelia

Jessie Keith

(Hybrid Neoregelia)

Glossy burgundy leaves dominate the Maria bromeliad, and then the center of the plant rosette turns intense coral or scarlet. A semi-epiphytic, hybrid tropical perennial, 'Maria' arose from breeding efforts of Patricia Bullis of Princeton, Florida. Bright, humid and warm conditions favor good growth. New plantlets arise on stolons from the main "mother" plant and replace it as it slowly dies months after blooming.

The flat, starfish-like rosette of this bromeliad comprises a radial bouquet of...