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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 20 of 351.

Image of Alstroemeria caryophyllaea photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

The Genus Alstroemeria is made up of 50 to 60 species of flowering herbaceous perennials native to South America. The genus is named for the Swedish baron Clas Alströmer who first collected seeds in South America around 1750. Today Lily-of-the-Incas hybrids and cultivars are most popular with florists for use in arrangements.

Alstroemeria are clump-forming and upright. They grow from fleshy rhizomatous crowns that spread laterally over time. They’ve numerous erect leafy...

Image of Amelanchier photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Serviceberry)

Image of Amelanchier canadensis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Canadian Serviceberry, Shadblow Serviceberry)

The graceful multi-stemmed habit of shadblow serviceberry, white spring flowers, edible summer fruits and bright fall foliage brings much to the landscape. A native of the eastern North America, it is a large deciduous shrub or small tree that spreads by suckers and naturally resides in wetlands, such as bogs or swamps, though it is also commonly found in moist woods and stream sides. It is very hardy and many cultivated varieties exist for garden culture. Its berry-like summer fruits are edible...

(Canadian Serviceberry, Shadblow Serviceberry)

The heavy-flowering shadblow, Spring Glory®, is relatively compact, upright and has brilliant orange and yellow fall color. The graceful multi-stemmed habit of shadblow serviceberry brings much to the landscape. Amelanchier canadensis is a native of the eastern United States and southern Canada, it is a large deciduous shrub or small tree that spreads by rhizomes and naturally resides in swampy locations. It is pretty through the seasons with its small white spring blossoms, edible summer...

Image of Amelanchier laevis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Allegheny Serviceberry)

This exceptional small tree is admired for its beautiful spring flowers, edible summer berries and glorious fall color. Allegheny serviceberry is a North American native that is naturally distributed from the Canadian province of Newfoundland southward to the states of Georgia and Alabama, so hardiness depends a lot on regional germplasm. This multi-stemmed deciduous small tree to large shrub usually inhabits moist open woods and meadows and tends to sucker and spread over time.

Bronzy new...

Image of Amelanchier x grandiflora photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Apple Serviceberry)

Beautiful in flower, form and fall leaf color, the apple serviceberry is a shrubby small tree that warrants use in a variety of garden settings. It is a naturally occurring hybrid that combines the vigor, adaptability, and beauty of its two parents, Allegheny serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis) and downy serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea). Many ornamental cultivars have been selected from this cross, all of which have great merit. The fruits are edible, sweet and can be eaten raw...

Image of Amelanchier x grandiflora

James Burghardt

(Apple Serviceberry, Autumn Brilliance Serviceberry)

The name of this cultivar is perfect. Autumn Brilliance serviceberry turns fall ablaze with rich red color. Beautiful in flower, form and fall leaf color, the apple serviceberry is a shrubby small tree that warrants use in a variety of garden settings. It is a naturally occurring hybrid that combines the vigor, adaptability, and beauty of its two parents, Allegheny serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis) and downy serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea). Many ornamental cultivars have been...

Image of Amelanchier x grandiflora

James H. Schutte

(Apple Serviceberry)

Beautiful in flower, form and fall leaf color, the apple serviceberry is a shrubby small tree that warrants use in a variety of garden settings. It is a naturally occurring hybrid that combines the vigor, adaptability, and beauty of its two parents, Allegheny serviceberry (Amelanchier laevis) and downy serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea). Many ornamental cultivars have been selected from this cross, all of which have great merit. The fruits are edible, sweet and can be eaten raw...

Image of Amorpha canescens photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(False Indigo, Leadplant)

Grayish light green feathery leaves on leadplant are a nice foil for the dark purple flowers in late summer and early fall. A rounded shrub that is deciduous when winters are very harsh, it is native from the hills and prairies of southern Canada to the south central United States. It was given its common name when it was believed to be an indicator of soils containing lead.

The fragrant leaves are pinnately compound - looking like a feather with ten to twenty pairs of tiny grayish and fuzzy...

Image of Amorpha fruticosa photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Bastard Indigo, Desert False Indigo)

Although having lovely green foliage, the desert false indigo's habit find few gardeners in love with it. The blue-violet to indigo colored flower spikes occur in midsummer. A spreading but also upright, rather unkempt deciduous shrub, it is native to a wide expanse of the eastern United States and southcentral Canada as well as in moister canyons and steamsides in the southwest America deserts. Often considered weedy, it is a tough, durable plant.

The pleasant bright green leaves are made up...