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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 219 of 351.

(Eastern Red Cedar, Manhattan Blue Eastern Red Cedar)

This attractive juniper forms a broad, symmetrical pyramid laden with elegant, dark, blue-green foliage which beautifies landscapes year-round. It is a cultivar of eastern red cedar, a hardy, highly adaptable evergreen which is widespread and common across much of eastern North America. 'Manhattan Blue' is a male clone which does not produce the small, berry-like cones found on female plants.

Eastern red cedars require full sun and thrive in well-drained soil of low to moderate fertility. ...

Image of Lamium maculatum

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Shell Pink Deadnettle, Spotted Deadnettle)

This is a distinctively variegated selection of spotted deadnettle, a superb herbaceous perennial groundcover native from North Africa through Europe to western Asia. A mat-forming perennial that spreads quickly by rooting stems, ‘Shell Pink’ has small, heart-shaped, coarsely toothed silvery leaves outlined vividly by dark green margins. In late spring to early summer it bears short, upright spikes of pink-flushed flowers. If sheared, it sends up new spikes that bloom with new flowers.

Grow ‘Shell...

Image of Larix decidua photo by: Mark Kane

Mark Kane

(European Larch)

Few true conifers lose there needles in winter, but those that do tend to have soft, pliable foliage and a lofty, architectural grace. The European larch is no exception. When young, it has a dense, pyramidal form but reaches huge heights and tends to develop drooping, contorted branches when mature. This valuable timber tree naturally exists in the mountains of Europe, particularly the Alps and Carpathians, and is very long-lived. The oldest recorded specimen is believed to have survived for 986...

Image of Larix decidua

James H. Schutte

(European Larch)

A dwarf selection of the European larch, 'Cherry Valley' has finely textured, soft needles that turn orange-yellow in autumn and fall in time for winter. This slow-growing selection was discovered as a dense witch's broom and maintains a neat, somewhat pyramidal habit.

European larch has short, dense clusters of soft, finely textured, rich green needles that turn warm shades in autumn and drop away in time for winter. Its strong trunk and branches are covered with smooth, scaly, lightly ridged,...

Image of Larix decidua

James H. Schutte

(European Larch)

A "green dreadlocks" weeping selection of the European larch, 'Julian's Weeper' has finely textured, green needles that are very bright green when they first emerge and turn golden yellow in autumn and drop away in time for winter. Its branches become very long and will eventually sweep the ground, so it must be limbed up. Unpruned specimens look a lot like Cousin It. This unique selection was introduced by Don and Peter Teese at Yamina Rare Plant Nursery in Monbulk, Australia.

European larch...

Image of Larix decidua

Mark A. Miller

(European Larch, Weeping European Larch)

Having mop-like, pendent branches, the weeping European larch has finely textured, soft green needles that become yellow in autumn and drop away in time for winter. Its branches can become very long and eventually sweep the ground. There are several forms of ‘Pendula.’ Most can reach substantial heights when mature.

Few true conifers lose there needles in winter, but those that do tend to have soft, pliable foliage and a lofty, architectural grace. The European larch is no exception. This valuable...

Image of Larix laricina photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Eastern Larch, Tamarack)

Illuminating the fall landscape with golden yellow needles, tamarack reaches skyward with its tall, open-branched, pyramid-like form. A tree native to much of Canada and the far northern United States, it is a relatively slow-growing deciduous conifer that thrives where soils are moist and summers cool. It is often found growing in bogs alongside wild blueberries and cranberries.

The needles are green to blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged in spiraled clusters atop short stubby spurs....

(Blue Sparkler Eastern Larch, Eastern Larch)

Brightening the landscape with a dense foliar display of light blue-green needles, Blue Sparkler dwarf tamarack also heralds fall with golden yellow needles. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, this variety was selected by Sid Waxman of the University of Connecticut. It is a vigorous, dwarfed, deciduous shrub that will become broader than tall.

The needles are bright blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The...

Image of Larix laricina

Mark A. Miller

(Deborah Waxman Eastern Larch, Eastern Larch)

A compact, conical dwarf shrub, the blue-green needles of Deborah Waxman dwarf tamarack turn coppery gold in autumn. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, this variety was selected by Sid Waxman of the University of Connecticut. It is a very slow growing, dwarf, deciduous cone-bearing shrub with dense branches and needled foliage.

The needles are bright blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The branchlets are...

(Eastern Larch, Lanark Eastern Larch)

Brightening the landscape with a dense foliar display of light green needles on yellow branchlets, Lanark dwarf tamarack also heralds fall with golden yellow needles. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, it is a slow growing, dwarfed, deciduous shrub that will become round and chest-high with time.

The needles are bright green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The thin, yellowy, young branchlets are held up and out...