Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 237 of 351.

Image of Malus baccata photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Siberian Crabapple)

Delicate and pretty with snowy white flowers in mid- to late spring, Siberian crabapple also bears showy red to yellow small fruits by late summer persisting into midwinter. This medium-sized deciduous tree is native to the mixed forests of the Himalayas northward across China and Mongolia into eastern Siberia. The bark is smooth and gray and its youngest branches are slender and curving. This tree often grows with multiple trunks.

In mid-spring the branches fill with copious amounts of light...

Image of Malus baccata

Jesse Saylor

(Jack's Siberian Crabapple, Siberian Crabapple)

Delicate and pretty with snowy white flowers in mid- to late spring, the Jack Siberian crabapple bears showy dark red-violet fruits by late summer persisting into midwinter. This medium-sized deciduous tree is native to the mixed forests of the Himalayas northward across China and Mongolia into eastern Siberia. The bark is smooth and gray-brown and small branchlets tend to curl downward.

In mid-spring the branches fill with copious amounts of pink-tinged white flower buds. The buds open to white,...

Image of Malus baccata

James H. Schutte

(Sweet Crabapple)

Delicate and pretty with snowy white flowers in mid- to late spring, Siberian crabapple also bears showy red to yellow small fruits by late summer persisting into midwinter. This medium-sized deciduous tree is native to the mixed forests of the Himalayas northward across China and Mongolia into eastern Siberia. The bark is smooth and gray and its youngest branches are slender and curving. This tree often grows with multiple trunks.

In mid-spring the branches fill with copious amounts of light...

Image of Malus domestica photo by: Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

(Apple)

There is nothing more satisfying than growing your own apple trees. The domestic apple is most commonly a medium-sized tree with a rounded to oval canopy. It originates from southeastern Europe, Siberia, and southwestern Asia and has been in cultivation for thousands of years. In spring, these trees offer sweet, fragrant flowers of light pink, white or rose, and in fall reward us with crisp, juicy apples.

These fruits have a wide variety of colors, textures and flavors and may be eaten out-of-hand,...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Baking Apple)

Introduced from Russia to England (and thence the United States) in the early nineteenth century, 'Alexander' is notable for its large fruits and its exceptional vigor and cold hardiness. The plump, conical, symmetrical fruits have thick greenish yellow or orange skin with red flushing and streaking. The grainy, cream-colored flesh of this cooking or dessert apple is crisp and juicy with mild flavor. The fruits do not keep well. The vigorous, spreading, rounded tree is relatively disease resistant,...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Grindstone Apple, Heritage Apple)

An antique variety originating in the eighteenth or early nineteenth century, 'American Pippin' is an exceptionally cold-hardy tree with long-keeping apples. The large spherical fruits have greenish yellow, pink flushed skin. The grainy, cream-colored flesh of this cider or cooking apple is firm and moderately juicy with mild flavor. The fruits store well for 6 months or more. The open, spreading tree has crooked, drooping branches.

There is nothing more satisfying than growing your own apple...

(Anna Apple, Apple, Yellow Eating Apple)

Bred in Israel, 'Anna' yields heavy crops of big sweet apples in a wide range of climates, notably climates too warm for most apples. Apples are descended from a species of deciduous tree native to southwestern Asia, a heritage that means they need the cold of winter to flower and fruit abundantly. Most need several hundred hours below 7 degrees C (45 degrees F), but 'Anna' needs fewer than 200 hours. All the same, the tree grows and fruits well in climates as cold as USDA Zone 5.

The tree is...

(Apple, Apple Babe Apple, Eating Apple)

A true genetic dwarf, ‘Apple Babe’ produces glossy, red apples with crisp, sweet flesh in late summer to early autumn. It is a high performer that even grows well in hot climates. Though compact, it bears heavily. This excellent selection was bred at Zaiger's Inc. Genetics of Modesto, California. For best fruit production, trees should be cross-pollinated by ‘Garden Delicious’ or other comparable apples.

There is nothing more satisfying than growing your own apple trees. The domestic apple...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Antique Apple, Apple, Red Apple, Winter Eating Apple)

Originating in Oxford County, Maine, in the late eighteenth century, 'Black Oxford' produces handsome, tasty, long-keeping apples on very hardy, disease-resistant trees. Ripening in mid-autumn, the spherical, medium-sized fruits have deep red skin. The greenish-white flesh of this dessert, cooking, or cider apple is firm, juicy, and sweet-tart. The fruits keep well for several months, their flavor and texture improving in storage. Plant another apple variety nearby for cross-pollination. Trees tend...

(Apple, Braeburn Apple, Red Eating Apple)

Discovered in New Zealand in the early 1950's, 'Braeburn' has become a major commercial apple for several reasons: the tree is vigorous and productive; the apples are an appealing red with an orange blush; the flesh is dense, crisp, flavorful, sweet and sub-acidic. What's more, in cold storage the apples keep their quality for four months. For the same reasons, 'Braeburn' is a good apple for the home garden.

Like most domestic apples, 'Braeburn' flowers and fruits best when planted in full sun...