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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 244 of 351.

Image of Mentha spicata

James H. Schutte

(Spearmint)

The vigorous 'Kentucky Colonel' has larger leaves than standard spearmint. This popular herb is a hardy perennial that originates from Europe. It is grown for its wonderfully flavorful and fragrant leaves. Oil of spearmint is used to flavor gum, candy, toothpaste and mouthwash and its dried leaves make a nice medicinal tea. It has been valued for food and medicine since ancient times and was used in Egypt, Greece and Rome.

The clump-forming herbaceous perennial is an aggressive plant that spreads...

Image of Mentha spicata var. crispa photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Curly Spearmint)

The vigorous herb, spearmint, is a hardy perennial that originates from Europe. It is grown for its wonderfully flavorful and fragrant leaves. Oil of spearmint is used to flavor gum, candy, toothpaste and mouthwash and its dried leaves make a nice medicinal tea. It has been valued for food and medicine since ancient times and was used in Egypt, Greece and Rome.

The clump-forming herbaceous perennial is an aggressive plant that spreads quickly by underground creeping stems called rhizomes. So,...

Image of Mentha x piperita photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Peppermint)

European in origin, peppermint is probably the best known of all herbs. Its smell and flavor permeates our world; it is in our toothpaste, mouthwash, gum, tea, candy and pairs particularly well with chocolate. Peppermint has been with us for a long time. Its leaves were used for food and medicine in ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome.

The clump-forming herbaceous perennial is an aggressive plant that spreads quickly by underground creeping stems called rhizomes. So, plant it only where you want it...

Image of Mentha x piperita

Mark A. Miller

(Lavender Mint, Peppermint)

European in origin, peppermint is probably the best known of all herbs. Its smell and flavor permeates our world; it is in our toothpaste, mouthwash, gum, tea, candy and pairs particularly well with chocolate. Peppermint has been with us for a long time. Its leaves were used for food and medicine in ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome.

The clump-forming herbaceous perennial is an aggressive plant that spreads quickly by underground creeping stems called rhizomes. So, plant it only where you want it...

Image of Mertensia virginica photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Virginia Bluebells)

The ephemeral Virginia bluebells is one of those "must have" spring-blooming wildflowers in the woodland garden. A clump-forming perennial with pink flower buds that open to dainty, sky blue flowers, it hails from eastern North America.

Emerging in early spring, the upright, branching stems yield soft, oval, bright-green to slightly blue-green leaves. At the tips of the stems clusters of pink buds appear and open to tubular, flared blossoms that range in color from sky blue to blue-violet, and,...

Image of Microbiota decussata photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Microbiota)

Russian arborvitae is a low, spreading, hardy evergreen with plume-like, gently drooping branches and short, smooth needles that turn from green to bronze-purple in the cold temperatures of fall and winter. Naturally found above the treeline on mountains in southeastern Siberia, this conifer grows broader with time but no higher, covering the rocky terrain. In spring its new growth is light green and gradually darkens to bright medium green as they broaden to form the flattened sprays. The branches...

Image of Mitchella repens photo by: ©Pennystone Gardens

©Pennystone Gardens

(Partridgeberry)

A signature plant of the eastern North American woods, this creeping evergreen roots along its stems to form lush mats of small rounded dark-green leaves with pale midribs. Paired, fragrant white flowers are borne in the leaf nodes in spring and early summer, followed by plump waxy red fruits. White-fruited forms are occasionally available. The fruits are edible but of poor flavor.

Give this year-round ornamental a humus-rich, acid to neutral soil and partial to full shade. It works well as a...

Image of Mitella diphylla photo by: ©Pennystone Gardens

©Pennystone Gardens

(Twinleaf Miterwort, Twoleaf Miterwort)

No one would ever accuse this North American woodland perennial of being spectacular. Yet, its mounded, fuzzy, maple-shaped leaves and its open spikes of small, lacy, off-white flowers do possess a quiet elegance and charm. Its bloom comes relatively late in the spring wildflower season, adding to its value.

This shade-loving perennial prefers humus-rich, well drained, neutral to alkaline soil. It is best in a naturalistic setting, but also works well in rock gardens and other settings where...

Image of Monarda

James Burghardt

(Hybrid Beebalm, Petite Wonder Beebalm)

The pretty dwarf 'Petite Wonder' is a more clump-forming Monarda that produces bright clusters of light pink flowers in summer. It was bred at the Morden Research Centre, Morden, Manitoba, Canada and is a cross between the two species Monarda didyma and Monarda fistulosa var. menthifolia.

This neat cultivar has dark shiny green leaves and is half the height of most garden beebalms. In summer it produces many radial clusters of showy pink flowers that draw hummingbirds...

Image of Morus alba

Mark A. Miller

(White Mulberry)

This beautiful weeping fruitless mulberry is a superior single specimen for modest sized yards. It is a breakthrough that resulted in vastly improved form, habit and overall beauty. Fruitless mulberries originate with a fruiting species native to China where its leaves are famous food for silk worms. In America their tolerance of extreme heat and cold led growers to find a fruitless clone that could make a resilient landscape tree, particularly in the arid West. This tree is a standard mulberry...