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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 258 of 351.

Image of Nuphar lutea photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Common Spatterdock, Yellow Pond Lily)

Native across much of eastern North America, yellow pond lily is a truly common water plant that is vigorous and pretty in a naturalistic way. It thrives in both fresh and salt water environments from marshes to pond or lake edges and sluggish stream sides. It is extraordinarily cold hardy but also thrives in the Deep South. Its starchy roots are edible and can be eaten raw or cooked, and its seeds can be roasted until crunchy and eaten like popcorn.

The glossy, arrow-shaped leaves of yellow...

(Blue Snake's Beard)

A clumping grass-like evergreen perennial with arching,leathery, strap-shaped leaves. The small white bell-shaped flowers appear in loose clusters at the end of upright or arching stalks in late summer, followed by small violet-blue fruits. There are cultivars with strikingly variegated leaves. For example, 'Vittatus' and 'White Dragon.' There is also a dwarf cultivar, 'Nanus,'useful between pavers.

This plant grows best in full sun with midday shade, or partial shade on humus-rich, well-drained...

(Blue Snake's Beard, Variegated Blue Snake's Beard)

This perennial, ‘Vittatus,’ is descended from an elegant shade-loving, clumping plant traditional in the Asian garden and native to the woodlands of Japan where it came into cultivation early on. It offers the fine texture of an ornamental grass with attractive flowers quite similar to those of the closely related genus, Liriope. It produces many ground-level growing points from which numerous tightly packed ribbon-like leaves rise in a relaxed fountain shape. These leaves are medium-green...

Image of Opuntia fragilis photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Brittle Pricklypear)

Native from the central and western United States all the way to central Canada, this pricklypear dispels the myth that cacti are only for warm climates. It is a low, mat-forming species bearing small, cylindrical or flattened, spiny pads that are specially adapted to survive beneath snow or dead prairie grass. It is also adapted to alpine conditions and is often found growing on upland, rocky outcrops.

Although they appear to be succulent leaves, the pads are in fact swollen stem segments...

Image of Opuntia fragilis

Jessie Keith

(Brittle Pricklypear)

Native from the central and western United States all the way to central Canada, brittle pricklypear dispels the myth that cacti are only for warm climates. The cultivar 'Frankfurt' forms dense compact clumps of small, chubby, oval to cylindrical pads. In late spring and early summer it bears lemon-yellow flowers that fade to peach.

Brittle pricklypear is a low, mat-forming species bearing small, cylindrical or flattened, spiny pads that are specially adapted to survive beneath snow or dead...

Image of Opuntia fragilis

Jessie Keith

(Brittle Pricklypear)

Native from the central and western United States all the way to central Canada, brittle pricklypear dispels the myth that cacti are only for warm climates. The cultivar 'Freiburg' forms dense compact clumps of small, chubby, oval to cylindrical pads. In late spring and early summer it bears lemon-yellow flowers that fade to purple-red.

Brittle pricklypear is a low, mat-forming species bearing small, cylindrical or flattened, spiny pads that are specially adapted to survive beneath snow or...

Image of Osmunda cinnamomea photo by: Mark Kane

Mark Kane

(Cinnamon Fern)

This imposing, clump forming, deciduous fern is native to North America, the West Indies, and eastern Asia. Its silver-haired fiddleheads emerge from thick rhizomes in mid-spring, unfurling to large triangular pinnate fronds. Hummingbirds visit the hairy stems to collect down for their nests. Leafless fertile fronds resembling fuzzy cinnamon sticks arise in late spring, collapsing in summer after shedding their spores.

Cinnamon fern thrives in damp humus-rich acidic soil in partial shade. Plant...

(Interrupted Fern)

A clump-forming herbaceous perennial with stately fronds "interrupted" by curious spore-bearing bodies that resemble shriveled bunches of grapes, this eastern North American and east Asian native is among the first ferns to appear in spring. Silky down from the emerging fiddleheads is collected by hummingbirds to furnish their nests. The fiddleheads unfurl to form a lush whorl of fresh green foliage, achieving imposing proportions in rich soil.

This impressive and interesting fern grows easily...

Image of Osmunda regalis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Regal Fern)

Regal, that is of outstanding merits, is but one way to describe the tremendously elegant fronds of the regal fern. A deciduous large fern that grows from an upright, massive rhizome that can become trunk-like, it is native to eastern North America, much of Europe and extreme northern Africa in moist swamps and bogs. The upright rhizome can branch with age and is covered in hairs and scars wrapped in black fibrous roots, called osmunda fiber.

Ranging from modestly sized to massive, the fronds...

(Royal Fern)

Regal, of outstanding merits, is but one way to describe the tremendously elegant fronds of the regal fern. Variety spectabilis is a deciduous large fern that grows from an upright, large rhizome that can become trunk-like and it is found in eastern North America. The upright rhizome can branch with age and is covered in hairs and scars wrapped in black fibrous roots, called osmunda fiber.

The arm's length-sized fronds of this fern are feather-like. This species of Osmunda is...