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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 278 of 351.

(Common Butterwort)

Found in moist habitats in northern latitudes worldwide, this small insectivorous perennial is grown for its charming flowers and curious bug-trapping leaves.

This cold-hardy plant produces rosettes of greasy, tongue-shaped, yellow- to pale-green leaves that glisten with numerous blunt, droplet-producing, insect-snaring hairs. The leaf margins roll inward to further ensnare trapped insects, which are digested by glands on the leaf surface. The leaves die back in fall to a fat bud-like winter...

Image of Pinus aristata photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bristlecone Pine)

This small, very long-lived and slow-growing pine is perfectly adapted to dry, high altitude mountain communities throughout the western United States where soils are thin and moisture scant. A native of the high country of western Colorado, northern New Mexico, and northern Arizona, it is best known for its very long lifespan and the twisted, gnarled form of older specimens. Some specimens are more than 2000 years old. The most ancient bristlecone trees (approaching 5000 years old) belong to Pinus...

Image of Pinus cembra photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Swiss Stone Pine)

This slow-growing tree from mountains of Europe and western Asia is prized for its compact, symmetrical, upright habit.

The long, stiff, dark-green to blue-green needles of this hardy conifer occur in bundles of five. In spring, trees produce tiny male and female cones near the branch tips. Female cones persist 3 years, maturing to purple-blue and then brown. Mature female cones are the size and shape of a large egg, and do not open.

A slow-growing, pyramidal to columnar tree with upswept...

Image of Pinus cembra

James H. Schutte

(Swiss Stone Pine)

A slow-growing tree from mountains of Europe and western Asia, Swiss stone pine is prized for its compact, symmetrical, upright form. The semi-dwarf cultivar 'Chalet' has blue-green needles and a narrowly conical habit.

The long, stiff, blue-green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of five. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and larger female cones near the branch tips. Female cones persist 3 years, maturing to purple-blue and then brown. Mature female cones are the size...

(Swiss Stone Pine)

A slow-growing tree from mountains of Europe and western Asia, Swiss stone pine is prized for its compact, symmetrical, upright form. The cultivar 'Compacta Glauca' has blue-green needles and a narrow, semi-dwarf habit.

The long, stiff, blue-green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of five. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and larger female cones near the branch tips. Female cones persist 3 years, maturing to purple-blue and then brown. Mature female cones are the size...

Image of Pinus cembra

James H. Schutte

(Swiss Stone Pine)

This slow-growing tree from mountains of Europe and western Asia is prized for its compact, symmetrical, upright habit.

The long, stiff, dark-green to blue-green needles of this hardy conifer occur in bundles of five. In spring, trees produce tiny male and female cones near the branch tips. Female cones persist 3 years, maturing to purple-blue and then brown. Mature female cones are the size and shape of a large egg, and do not open.

A slow-growing, pyramidal to columnar tree with upswept...

Image of Pinus flexilis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Limber Pine)

This handsome, cold-hardy, small- to medium-sized evergreen tree comes from mountains of western North America from Canada to Mexico.

The medium to long, supple, bluish-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five toward the tips of long flexible branches. The densely borne needles have conspicuous white lines on their upper surface. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large female cones near the branch tips. The yellowish brown female cones mature in 2 years, dropping...

Image of Pinus flexilis

Jesse Saylor

(Limber Pine)

Rapidly forming a low dense irregular mass of sprawling branches, this prostrate evergreen is one of numerous selections of limber pine, a hardy small to medium-sized tree from mountains of western North America.

The long, supple, bluish-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five toward the tips of long lax branches. The needles have conspicuous white lines on their upper surface. In spring, plants may produce tiny male cones and large female cones near the branch tips. The yellowish...

Image of Pinus flexilis

Jesse Saylor

(Limber Pine)

This handsome, cold-hardy, small- to medium-sized evergreen tree comes from mountains of western North America from Canada to Mexico.

The medium to long, supple, bluish-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five toward the tips of long flexible branches. The densely borne needles have conspicuous white lines on their upper surface. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large female cones near the branch tips. The yellowish brown female cones mature in 2 years, dropping...

Image of Pinus flexilis

Jesse Saylor

(Limber Pine, Vanderwolf's Pyramid Pine)

A slow-growing, compact selection of limber pine, ‘Vanderwolf’s Pyramid’ is an excellent evergreen conifer for dry, temperate climates. The parent species is named for its extremely flexible limbs, some so limber they can be tied into a knot. It is native to mountains throughout the western U.S, from Canada to Mexico. Such a large range explains the tolerance of ‘Vanderwolf’s Pyramid’ for varied conditions such as open space, parks, urban sites, dry, rocky places, and high elevations. An upright,...