Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 280 of 351.

Image of Pinus ponderosa photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Ponderosa Pine)

Poderosa pine is the most common pine in the American West and is the primary species in many middle elevation forests. Its range extends throughout most mountain ranges from the Rockies to California, including southern British Columbia and the highest elevations of northwestern Mexico.

Young trees have a neatly pyramidal habit but when mature they develop a tall, bushy, irregular crown. The bark can be quite beautiful and impressive in older specimens. It is cinnamon orange with contrasting...

Image of Pinus resinosa photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(American Red Pine, Norway Pine)

An important timber tree, this medium to large, horizontally branched pine is native from Newfoundland and the eastern United States to the northern Great Plains.

The long, rubbery, medium- to dark-green needles of this evergreen conifer occur in bundles of two. They are held toward the tips of spreading, reddish branches. The needles snap neatly in two when bent. In spring, tiny male cones and relatively small female cones appear near the branch tips. The squat, broadly conical, brown female...

Image of Pinus strobus photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(White Pine)

Valued as a landscape and lumber tree, white pine is a stately, fast-growing evergreen with supple green needles and dark grayish brown bark. It is distributed across the eastern half of North America, from Newfoundland to Georgia, and grows best in open, upland areas with well-drained soils. Mature specimens become very tall, have straight trunks and broad, pyramidal crowns.

The long, flexible needles come in fascicles (groups) of five. These are fully evergreen and shed every two to three...

Image of Pinus strobus

Mark A. Miller

(Bloomer's Dark Globe White Pine, White Pine)

Selected for its dwarf rounded habit, this small shrub little resembles the stately white pines that dominate much of the forest of eastern North America.

Like all white pines, this cultivar has long flexible evergreen needles in fascicles (bundles) of five. The needles are medium-green. This dwarf selection slowly forms a dense irregular globe of approximately chest height.

White pine grows best in full sun and well-drained sandy loam. It is moderately weak-wooded and can be damaged by...

Image of Pinus strobus

Jesse Saylor

(Dwarf White Pine)

This slower growing, shorter selection of white pine is a reliable compact landscape tree with shorter blue-green needles and dark grayish brown bark. Unlike the standard species, it develops a rounded crown and is less vulnerable to storm damage.

Valued as a landscape and lumber tree, white pine is a stately, fast-growing evergreen. It is distributed across the eastern half of North America, from Newfoundland to Georgia, and grows best in open, upland areas with well-drained soils. Mature specimens...

Image of Pinus strobus

Mark A. Miller

(Coney Island White Pine, White Pine)

Selected for its low mounded habit, this beautiful dwarf shrub little resembles the stately white pines that dominate much of the forest of eastern North America.

Like all white pines, this cultivar has long flexible evergreen needles in fascicles (bundles) of five. The needles are blue-green. Unlike many dwarf forms of white pine, this cultivar produces male and female cones in spring. The conical female cones are olive-green and rubbery when young, brown and woody at maturity. This dwarf selection...

Image of Pinus strobus

Jesse Saylor

(Fastigiate White Pine, White Pine)

A narrow-crowned form of one of eastern North America's most stately and beautiful pines, this popular cultivar originated in cultivation in Germany in the late nineteenth century.

Like all white pines, this cultivar has long flexible evergreen needles in fascicles (bundles) of five. The needles are blue-green. Plants bear large pendent female cones and clusters of small yellowish male cones on new growth in spring. The conical female cones are olive-green and rubbery when young, brown and woody...

Image of Pinus strobus

Gerald L. Klingaman

(White Pine)

This is among the smallest of all forms of white pine, Pinus strobus, with a stature and proportions that make it a true shrub. It is a form of a species that has proven to be a reliable component in American landscapes for hundreds of years. The range of the species spans most of the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada. An extremely slow-growing selecton, ‘Greg’ bears short, supple, blue-green needles. It very slowly forms a calf-high mound somewhat wider than tall, making a fine...

Image of Pinus strobus

Mark A. Miller

(Minuta White Pine, White Pine)

Selected for its low mounded habit, this dwarf shrub little resembles the stately white pines that dominate much of the forest of eastern North America.

Like all white pines, this cultivar has flexible evergreen needles in fascicles (bundles) of five. The blue-green needles are relatively short. This dwarf selection slowly forms a dense domed knee-high hummock that is somewhat broader than tall.

White pine grows best in full sun and well-drained sandy loam. It is moderately weak-wooded...

Image of Pinus strobus

Mark A. Miller

(Ontario White Pine, White Pine)

A dwarf selection of the pine species that dominates much of the forest of eastern North America, 'Ontario' grows slowly into a low, spreading, asymmetrical shrub.

Like all white pines, 'Ontario' has flexible evergreen needles in fascicles (bundles) of five. The blue-green needles are of varying lengths. This dwarf cultivar slowly forms a dense spreading chest-high shrub that often has a sloping top.

White pine grows best in full sun and well-drained sandy loam. It is moderately weak-wooded...