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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 292 of 351.

Image of Quercus robur

Jesse Saylor

(English Oak)

A ruggedly handsome tree with variably arching boughs and twigs, the weeping English oak has strong branches with classic lobed leaves and oval acorns. A deciduous tree native to Europe and western Asia, it has bark that is ridged and furrowed, rich brown to gray-black in color. The wavy-edged leaves are oblong with very short stems with few to many lobes. They are glossy green to nearly deep bluish green with a lighter green underside, first emerging very downy in the late spring. As the leave emerge,...

Image of Quercus robur

Jesse Saylor

(English Oak)

Smaller growing and with smaller leaves that emerge red-brown, the purple English oak has strong branches on its rounded canopy, with classic lobed leaves and oval acorns. A deciduous tree native to Europe and western Asia, it has bark that is ridged and furrowed, rich brown to gray-black in color. The wavy-edged leaves are oblong with very short stems with few to many lobes. They are first downy and red-brown to burgundy in color in spring, but become glossier and purplish-green by summer. Hotter...

Image of Quercus robur f. fastigiata photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Fastigiate English Oak)

An unusually narrow selection of English oak, this tree has strong, closely-spaced branches and a columnar habit, with classic lobed leaves and oval acorns. The parent species is a deciduous tree native to Europe and western Asia. This selection has ridged and furrowed bark that is rich brown to gray-black in color and leaves that are oblong with very short petioles (leaf stems) and few to many lobes. They are glossy-green to nearly bluish-green with a lighter-green underside but emerge very downy...

Image of Quercus rubra photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Northern Red Oak)

The northern red oak is a tall, adaptable, deciduous shade tree valued for its fine lumber and beauty. Mature trees develop a broad, rounded crown and strong, upright central leader with easy-to-identify bark with wide, shallow fissures that are light gray-brown on top and dark brown in the fissures. It is native across much of eastern North America and naturally inhabits upland hardwood forests, slopes and ravines. Unlike many northern hardwood trees, it is relatively fast-growing.

Its large...

Image of Quercus rubra var. ambigua photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Northern Red Oak)

This name is sometimes used for variants or hybrids of Quercus rubra. Also known as var. borealis, these trees are characterized by smaller acorns, with cups that cover the lower third of the nut, and smaller leaves. Some of these oaks are hybrids between red oak and pin oak (Quercus palustris).

The northern red oak is a tall, adaptable, deciduous shade tree valued for its fine lumber and beauty. Mature trees develop a broad, rounded crown and strong, upright central...

Image of Quercus rubra var. rubra photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Northern Red Oak)

The most commonly occurring type or form of red oak, var. rubra has larger acorns than those of var. ambigua, with shallower cups. Its leaves are also slightly larger.

The northern red oak is a tall, adaptable, deciduous shade tree valued for its fine lumber and beauty. Mature trees develop a broad, rounded crown and strong, upright central leader with easy-to-identify bark with wide, shallow fissures that are light gray-brown on top and dark brown in the fissures. It is native...

Image of Quercus x schuettei photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Hybrid Oak, Schuette's Oak)

One of the best hybrid oaks for wildlife, Schuette's oak usually produces heavy amounts of edible acorns even when a youthful plant. A slow-growing deciduous tree, it was discovered in Wisconsin by J. H. Schuette in the late 19th century. It is formed by a natural cross between the burr oak (Quercus macrocarpa)and swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor) in the Great Lakes Region of North America. Its bark is corky, shallowly furrowed, platy and beige-brown.

The glossy deep green...

Image of Ratibida columnifera photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Mexican Hat)

The common name "Mexican hat" aptly describes the sombrero-like blossoms of this perennial from prairies and meadows of central North America. It is often cultivated as an annual or biennial.

This hardy perennial forms dense mounds of lacy, finely lobed, gray-green leaves. Showy blossoms with drooping yellow rays and a long protruding central cone are borne on tall branching stems from early to late summer. The rays of variety pulcherimma are variously stained with purple. The thimble-shaped...

Image of Ratibida columnifera

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Mexican Hat)

The common name "Mexican hat" aptly describes the sombrero-like blossoms of this compact seed-grown cultivar of Ratibida columnifera var. pulcherimma. A perennial from prairies and meadows of central North America, Mexican hat is often cultivated as an annual or biennial.

This hardy perennial forms dense mounds of lacy, finely lobed, gray-green leaves. Showy blossoms with drooping, yellow-rimmed, maroon rays and a long protruding central cone are borne on branching, knee-high...

Image of Ratibida pinnata photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Pinnate Prairie Coneflower)

Tall and thinly foliaged, pinnate prairie coneflowers becomes royalty in the meadow from summer to fall as it shows off its yellow petaled flowers. An herbaceous perennial native to central North America, it grows in both fertile and rocky, nutrient poor soils.

The tall, lanky plants have sparse, narrow green leaves. Beginning in summer and long-lasting, stem tips bear an egg-shaped cone that is first silvery green as the yellow petals unfurl around it. With age, the petals become brighter golden...