Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 295 of 351.

Image of Rhus glabra photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Smooth Sumac)

Producing brilliant scarlet fall foliage and edible small red fruits, the smooth sumac is only suitable for spacious landscapes. This deciduous, bushy, suckering shrub to very small tree is native to sunny, dry lands all across North America: from the southern half of Canada to northeastern Mexico. It's the only tree/shrub species native to all of the contiguous United States. Leaning, crooked but beautiful trunks and open branching develops on the smooth sumac.

Distinguish this sumac species...

Image of Rhus typhina photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Staghorn Sumac)

A common eastern North American shrub or small tree, staghorn sumac produces an umbrella-like crown of feathery foliage in summer that turns radiant shades of orange, red and yellow in fall. It is fully deciduous, very hardy and tends to spread forming large colonies over time. The staghorn reference in its common name refers to its stems and leaf petioles which have a fuzzy brown surface, much like that of deer antler velvet. Wild populations are common and tend to inhabit open forests and forest...

Image of Rhus typhina

Mark Kane

(Staghorn Sumac)

Very ornate, feathery foliage is a hallmark of ‘Dissecta,’ a cutleaf staghorn sumac. Along with its feathery leaves it has handsome red fruit spikes at the tips of the branches and yellow and orange-red fall color. A deciduous, upright, colonizing, large shrub, it is native to much of eastern North America. It often looks like a multi-stemmed, flat-canopy small tree.

Although the bark is smooth and sandy brown, younger twigs are more reddened with a brown fuzz. In late spring the dark green leaves...

Image of Rhus typhina

Jesse Saylor

(Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac)

Large, ferny leaves comprised of many fine, deeply cut (laciniate) leaflets are the crowning glory of this more elegant cultivar of staghorn sumac. In fall, the deep green leaves of 'Laciniata' turn eye-catching shades of flaming red. The plants are slightly less vigorous than standard sumac, which is actually a benefit.

A common eastern North American shrub or small tree, staghorn sumac produces an umbrella-like crown of feathery foliage in summer that turns radiant shades of orange, red and...

Image of Ribes alpinum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Alpine Currant)

Unlike its edible kin, gooseberries and currants, the Alpine currant, a native of Europe, is grown mostly as a hedge or specimen plant for its size, shape, glossy leaves and tolerance of pruning. It is a medium-sized, hardy deciduous shrub that with age has many branching stems and takes a spreading shape. It is dioecious (plants are either male or female) and the female plants have greenish yellow flowers of very little ornamental value. The leaves are green to dark-green, slightly lobed, toothy,...

Image of Ribes alpinum

Mark A. Miller

(Alpine Currant, Green Mound Alpine Currant)

Unlike its edible kin, gooseberries and currants, the Alpine currant, a native of Europe, is grown mostly as a hedge or specimen plant for its size, shape, glossy leaves and tolerance of pruning. It is a medium-sized, hardy deciduous shrub that with age has many branching stems and takes a spreading shape. It is dioecious (plants are either male or female) and the female plants have greenish yellow flowers of very little ornamental value. The leaves are green to dark-green, slightly lobed, toothy,...

(Black Currant)

Grown for its flavorful berries, black currant is a small to medium-sized deciduous shrub from Eurasia. The cultivar 'Ben Lomond' produces abundant clusters of relatively large, flavorful, few-seeded fruits. The firm, tart, long-lasting berries ripen purple-black in midsummer. They are preceded by drooping clusters of inconspicuous greenish and purple flowers in spring. The fruits are excellent for preserves, pies, and sauces. The toothed, three-lobed, maple-like leaves emit a pungent odor when bruised....

Image of Ribes nigrum

Ulysses Prentiss Hedrick et al., USDA Corvallis

(Black Currant)

Grown for its flavorful berries, black currant is a small to medium-sized deciduous shrub from Eurasia. An heirloom variety introduced before 1885, 'Boskoop Giant' produces clusters of plump, juicy, exceptionally flavorful, few-seeded fruits. The round, tart, long-lasting berries ripen purple-black in early to midsummer, becoming sweeter as they mature. They are preceded by drooping clusters of inconspicuous greenish and purple flowers in spring. The fruits are excellent for preserves, pies, and...

(Black Currant)

A small, productive deciduous shrub, ‘Consort’ black currant is notable for its pendent clusters of greenish-yellow flowers in early spring followed by grape-like clusters of nearly-black, tart, sweet fruits. It also has the distinction of being harmless to white pines (Pinus nigrum) because it is immune to white pine blister rust, a usually fatal disease of P. nigrum that most black currants can carry and spread. This plant needs four to five years to mature and produce full...

Image of Ribes rubrum photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Red Currant)

Grown for its flavorful berries, this small to medium-sized deciduous shrub from Eurasia produces bunches of small translucent few-seeded fruits that ripen to red in early summer. They are preceded by drooping clusters of inconspicuous greenish flowers in early spring. High in vitamin C and other antioxidants, the tart fruits are excellent for jellies, sauces, and cooked desserts, and are also eaten fresh. Plants are self-fruitful. The toothed, three-lobed, maple-like leaves are medium-green and...