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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 316 of 351.

Image of Solanum dulcamara photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Climbing Nightshade, Nightshade)

Though attractive, deadly nightshade is a weedy, perennial vine that is rarely planted purposefully. It is native to Eurasia but has become naturalized across much of North America. In the wild, it favors thickets, open woods and is often found climbing fences because the seeds are passed through bird droppings.

This clambering vine is borne from a taproot that tends to spread by rhizomes. Its long, vining stems are smooth, often purple and climb by twining around the stems and branches of...

Image of Solidago canadensis photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Canadian Goldenrod)

One of the most common goldenrods for late-summer and fall, Canadian goldenrod is a North America perennial known for its tall stems of fluffy, golden flowers. It has a very wide distribution, from northern Mexico up to the far reaches of Canada and Alaska, so it should come as no surprise that populations are variable in hardiness and appearance. There are numerous natural varieties that vary in size, stem hairiness, leaf texture and flowerhead size. Natural populations tend to favor open sites...

Image of Solidago rugosa photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Rough-stemmed Goldenrod, Wrinkleleaf Goldenrod)

Early autumn is when wrinkleleaf goldenrod really shines. This tall herbaceous perennial wildflower produces golden-yellow flowers on arching, slightly hairy stems. It is a common sight in the moist meadows, roadsides and woodland edges of the eastern United States, from Quebec, Canada down to Texas. Natural populations even exist in northern Florida.

Like all goldenrods, this species maintains an unassuming appearance until it bursts into flower in fall. It forms upright clumps and has long,...

Image of Sorbaria photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(False Spirea)

Image of Sorbaria sorbifolia photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(False Spirea)

Providing spring to fall interest with its handsome ferny leaves, the Ural falsespirea is particularly arresting in midsummer when covered with frothy white flowerheads. An upright, suckering, thicketing shrub, it is native to northern Asia eastward to Japan.

Emerging very early in spring, the long frond-like compound leaves comprise numerous narrow leaflets. Young leaves are glossy light green with blushes of coppery red. In summer, upright astilbe-like clusters of tiny white flowers adorn...

Image of Sorbus photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Mountain Ash)

Image of Sorbus

Jesse Saylor

(Hybrid Mountain Ash)

Named for the color of its showy berry-like fruits, this hybrid of European mountain ash grows into a handsome small deciduous tree. Its lush ferny bright green leaves turn orange and red tones in fall. Musky-scented dull white flowers in late spring, clusters of apricot-yellow fruits in late summer and fall, and cherry-like gray-brown bark with conspicuous horizontal pores give it further multi-seasonal interest. The berries are favored by birds.

Grow ‘Apricot Lady' in almost any moist, well-drained,...

Image of Sorbus

Jesse Saylor

(Hybrid Mountain Ash)

Image of Sorbus

Jesse Saylor

(Hybrid Mountain Ash)

Named for the color of its showy berry-like fruits, this hybrid of European mountain ash grows into a handsome small deciduous tree. Its lush ferny bright green leaves turn orange and red tones in fall. Musky-scented dull white flowers in late spring, clusters of pale pink fruits in late summer and fall, and cherry-like gray-brown bark with conspicuous horizontal pores give it further multi-seasonal interest. The berries are favored by birds.

Grow ‘Kirsten Pink' in almost any moist, well-drained,...

Image of Sorbus

Jesse Saylor

(Hybrid Mountain Ash)

Named for the color of its showy berry-like fruits, this hybrid of European mountain ash grows into a handsome small deciduous tree. Its lush ferny bright green leaves turn orange and red tones in fall. Musky-scented dull white flowers in late spring, clusters of coral-pink fruits in late summer and fall, and cherry-like gray-brown bark with conspicuous horizontal pores give it further multi-seasonal interest. The berries are favored by birds.

Grow ‘Rowancroft Coral Pink' in almost any moist,...