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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 321 of 351.

Image of Syringa reticulata ssp. pekinensis photo by: Lottah Nursery, Australia

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Tree Lilac)

Showy cloud-like clusters of fragrant ivory blossoms cover this hardy and highly variable Chinese native long after most other lilacs have bloomed. Whether grown as a rounded multi-stemmed large shrub or as a single-trunked small tree, it offers ornamental interest at all seasons, thanks to its glossy peeling golden-brown bark. The large paired clusters of tiny creamy-white flowers develop at the branch tips in late spring or early summer. They are privet-scented: sweet but with an undertone of cut...

Image of Syringa villosa photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Late Lilac)

Few lilacs bloom as late in the season as the super hardy late lilac. This northern Chinese native produces conical upright clusters of purplish-pink or white blooms at the tips of the current season's growth. The fragrant tubular flowers open more than a week or more after those of common lilac (Syringa vulgaris). Green seed capsules follow, which change to dark brown by midsummer. Mature specimens reach medium height and develop an upright, rounded habit. Its sandy-brown stems support...

Image of Syringa vulgaris

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Agincourt Beauty Lilac, Common Lilac)

The purple-flowered ‘Agincourt Beauty’ features some of the largest individual flowers of any lilac cultivar. This exceptionally cold hardy Canadian hybrid was bred by Slater and introduced in 1968. When not in bloom the large, rounded, deciduous shrub offers little interest, but it is exceptionally beautiful when its huge flower panicles appear in late spring or early summer.

Dark royal purple flowers cover the branch tips of ‘Agincourt Beauty.' Even when in bud, the panicles look like upright...

Image of Syringa vulgaris

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Belle de Nancy Lilac, Common Lilac)

The delicate and delightfully feminine French lilac 'Belle de Nancy' is a scented jewel for the spring garden. It is an old double-flowered variety bred at the famous Lemoine Nursery near Nancy, France where many classic French lilacs were developed. 'Belle de Nancy' was introduced in 1891 and remains in cultivation, proving its desirability.

When not in bloom the large, rounded, deciduous shrub offers little interest, but it is exceptionally beautiful when its flower panicles appear in late...

Image of Syringa vulgaris

Russell Stafford

(Charm Lilac, Common Lilac)

The highly cold hardy, richly fragrant ‘ Charm’ can be planted as far north as Alaska. This pink-flowered French lilac was introduced sometime before 1942 and remains in cultivation today.

When not in bloom the large, rounded, deciduous shrub offers little interest, but it is exceptionally beautiful when its upright flower panicles appear in late spring to early summer. ‘Charm’ offers tons of soft pink flowers that are highly fragrant and ideal for cutting. The blooms are held at tips of the...

Image of Syringa vulgaris

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Common Lilac, Hope Lilac)

The cold hardy and intensely fragrant ‘Hope’ is one of the best double blue-flowered lilacs. It’s guaranteed to become the highlight of northern gardens in the spring. This superior variety was bred in Russia sometime before 1974 by renowned hybridist, Kolesnikov.

When not in bloom the large, rounded, deciduous shrub offers little interest, but it is exceptionally beautiful when its upright flower panicles appear in late spring to early summer. ‘Hope’ is one of the heaviest bloomers in cultivation....

Image of Syringa vulgaris

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Common Lilac, Lavender Lady Lilac)

This is one of the few French lilacs well-suited to southern gardens. This heat-tolerant cultivar was bred in the 1960s by John Sobeck of Descanso Gardens in Southern California. ‘Lavender Lady’ is one of the original Descanso Hybrids developed a half century ago at the Rancho del Descanso Nursery and is parent to many other California lilac hybrids.

When not in bloom the large, rounded, deciduous shrub offers little interest, but it is exceptionally beautiful when its large flower panicles...

Image of Syringa vulgaris

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Common Lilac)

This compact, double-flowered antique French lilac offers spectacular color and fragrance to smaller garden spaces. It was bred and introduced in 1915 by famed French nurseryman Lemoine, a modern lilac innovator and founder of the famous Lemoine Nursery in Nancy, France. This is an especially fine, exceptional cultivar according to the famed lilac specialist, Father John L. Fiala.

When not in bloom this upright, open deciduous shrub offers little interest, but it is beautiful when its conical...

Image of Syringa vulgaris

Russell Stafford

(Common Lilac)

Vigorous and old-fashioned, ‘Rochester’ is one of the most outstanding American white lilacs available. This variety was discovered as a seedling of the French hybrid ‘Edith Clavel’ in New York’s Highland Nursery in the 1950s. It has a shorter stature and is believed to be a naturally occurring tetraploid, according to the famed lilac specialist Father John L. Fiala.

When not in bloom this rounded deciduous shrub offers little interest, but it is beautiful when its numerous conical flower panicles...

Image of Syringa x chinensis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Chinese Lilac)

Originating in the Botanic Garden at Rouen, France, in 1777, this hybrid of common lilac betters its parent in its dense, graceful, arching, non-suckering habit, its smaller daintier leaves, and its relative tolerance of hot summers and mild winters. Its broad clusters of fragrant purple-lilac flowers crowd the branch tips in mid- or late spring, slightly earlier than those of common lilac. They attract butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees. The narrowly oval medium-green leaves are a third to half...