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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 324 of 351.

Image of Syringa x prestoniae

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Miss Canada Lilac, Preston's Lilac)

This large, deciduous shrub is distinguished by its prolific and beautiful blooms. In late spring to early summer, ‘Miss Canada’ produces many clusters of subtly sweet smelling, deep pink flowers that are rose-red in bud. These bloom later than the common lilac and prefer full sun and well drained, neutral to slightly acidic soil. Be sure to prune them in summer after they flower. Incorporate them into the landscape as feature plants, in mixed borders or as hedges.

(Nocturne Lilac, Preston's Lilac)

A late-blooming, rock-hardy lilac with showy blue-purple blooms, this 1936 introduction from the Morden Research Station in Manitoba bears masses of branching pyramidal flower clusters at its stem tips in late spring. The fragrant flowers open more than a week after those of common lilac and are borne on the current year's growth. This is one of many cultivars of Syringa x prestoniae, the hybrid between nodding lilac (Syringa komarowii ssp. reflexa) and late lilac...

Image of Syringa x prestoniae

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Preston's Lilac, Telimena Lilac)

A late-blooming, rock-hardy lilac with showy pale pink blooms, this 1970 introduction from Polish hybridizer Wladyslaw Bugala bears masses of branching pyramidal flower clusters at its stem tips in late spring. The fragrant flowers open more than a week after those of common lilac and are borne on the current year's growth. This is one of many cultivars of Syringa x prestoniae, the hybrid between nodding lilac (Syringa komarowii ssp. reflexa) and late lilac (Syringa...

Image of Tamarix ramosissima photo by: JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

(Saltcedar)

Despite its beautiful soft pink blossoms, this plant is among the most banned of all invasive exotics. In the Southwestestern U.S., the agricultural success of tamarisk trees as windbreaks has turned into an ecological tragedy. This species, native over a huge part of Asia Minor, has the potential to naturalize in many climates and disturb native plant communities throughout arid regions.

This species reproduces easily from seed. It has proven to be highly competitive with desert natives and may...

Image of Tamarix ramosissima

Jesse Saylor

(Saltcedar)

Despite its beautiful soft pink blossoms, this plant is among the most banned of all invasive exotics. In the Southwestestern U.S., the agricultural success of tamarisk trees as windbreaks has turned into an ecological tragedy. This species, native over a huge part of Asia Minor, has the potential to naturalize in many climates and disturb native plant communities throughout arid regions.

This species reproduces easily from seed. It has proven to be highly competitive with desert natives and may...

Image of Taraxacum officinale photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Common Dandelion)

The dandelion, a dreaded perennial lawn weed that children love to spread joyously as they pick and blow their puffy seedheads hither and yon. One can’t deny their spring flowers are cheerful, and if you have a foraging instinct for natural food their young greens are very tasty, but watch out for those seedheads. Just a small breeze will send hundreds of parachute seeds all across the landscape, and almost all will germinate digging their hard-to-pull taproots deep into the soil. Even though dandelions...

Image of Thelypteris palustris photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Eastern Marsh Fern)

An attractive, medium-sized, deciduous fern that does well in damp soil, marsh fern occurs throughout much of the middle and upper latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Its lacy, erect, pale blue-green fronds spread rapidly via wandering underground rhizomes. Spores are borne on fertile fronds whose segments have curled margins.

This hardy, vigorously spreading, moisture-loving fern grows best in partial to full sun. It is adaptable to most soils that are not dry or submerged. It is perfect for...

Image of Thermopsis lupinoides photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Lanceleaf Thermopsis, Russian False Lupine)

As long as the summertime temperatures don't get too hot, the Russian false lupine is an excellent and dynamic addition to a meadow or mixed perennial garden. This herbaceous plant, growing from slowly spreading rhizomes, forms a tidy clump. It's native to Siberia and Alaska.

Touch the green leaves of the Russian false lupine and enjoy a silky but hairy sensation. The leaves comprise three lance-shaped leaflets and two leaf-like stipules. In spring, stem tips produce an upright spike of bright...

Image of Thermopsis montana photo by: TL

TL

(Mountain False Lupine, Mountain Goldenbanner)

Growing quickly once winter snows melt away, the mountain false lupine finally starts its yellow flower display anytime from early to midsummer. This clump-forming herbaceous perennial grows from spreading rhizome roots. It's native to the high elevation, moist woodland openings and meadows from southeastern British Columbia to northern New Mexico across the Rocky Mountains.

The slender stems may be purplish with a white, hairy overcast. A leaf comprises three green leaflets, with two tiny leaf-like...

Image of Thuja occidentalis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Eastern Arborvitae, White Cedar)

It is likely that no native American evergreen is more prevalent in the North American landscape. Arborvitae is a hardy pyramidal coniferous tree usually cultivated in one of its many shrubby forms. This native of eastern North America has flattened feathery sprays of soft, scale-like, medium to dark green foliage that may turn shades of green and brown in winter. The leaves emit a pungent odor when bruised. Its dense branches often curve upwards, giving mature trees a soft, attractive look. The...