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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 34 of 351.

Image of Artemisia stelleriana

Yoder Brothers

(Seashore Wormwood, Silver Brocade Wormwood, Star Wormwood)

Low-down, almost prostrate in habit, this selection of the popular foliage annual, Dusty Miller, is prized for its beautiful silver mat of overlapping, small, lobed leaves. The parent species of ‘Silver Brocade’ is native to coastal areas of northern Asia and Japan, and has naturalized in both Europe and the United States. The parent and this selection have proven tolerant of salt air and salty sandy soils. All the same, you can count on ‘Silver Brocade’ to do far better in areas with ordinary drainage,...

Image of Artemisia vulgaris photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Common Wormwood, Mugwort)

Put this weedy plant in the same classification as notorious weeds like Canadian thistle, star thistle, spotted knapweed and others. It is a bear of a plant that is next to impossible to get rid of once it takes hold. Plants aggressively spread via underground stems called rhizomes that form large matted colonies—even the smallest rhizome left in the ground will result in a new plant. The name “vulgaris” means common and this plant is common because it is a pest. Can you tell this is not one of our...

Image of Artemisia vulgaris

PlantHaven

(Common Wormwood, Mugwort, Oriental Limelight Mugwort)

This variegated form of the weedy common wormwood has pretty enough golden variegated foliage but is profoundly invasive in the garden and beyond. It is next to impossible to get rid of once it takes hold. Plants aggressively spread via underground stems, called rhizomes, which form large matted colonies—even the smallest rhizome left in the ground will result in a new plant.

Common Wormwood is an herbaceous perennial that originates from areas across Europe, Africa, Asia and arguably northwestern...

Image of Aruncus photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Goat's Beard)

Image of Aruncus

PlantHaven

(Goat's Beard, Misty Lace Goat's Beard)

Image of Aruncus aethusifolius photo by: Yoder Brothers

Yoder Brothers

(Dwarf Goat's Beard)

Image of Aruncus dioicus photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bride's Feathers, Goat's Beard)

A mound of ferny leaves and tall white plumes make goat's beard a lovely accent plant. It is an upright, tall perennial of woodlands in circumboreal regions-- native to eastern North America as well as Europe and across Siberia into eastern Asia.

The mid- to dark green leaves are large, and made up of many small oval leaflets that have teeth on their edges. Collectively they produce a lovely fern-like texture. In early and midsummer, tall stems tower above the leaves and produce creamy white male-gendered...

Image of Asarum canadense photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Canadian Wild Ginger)

By far one of the best native herbaceous groundcovers for shade, Canadian wild ginger creates a lush, thick mat of heart-shaped leaves that shine from spring to fall. This very hardy woodland wildflower exists in fertile hardwood forests across the whole of eastern North America. As its common name suggests, its long, somewhat fleshy roots have a pungent, ginger-like taste and were valued for food and medicine by both Native Americans and early colonists. In some parts of eastern Canada they still...

Image of Asclepias incarnata photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Swamp Milkweed)

Swamp milkweed is native to pond edges and stream banks of the eastern and Midwestern United States. Though this perennial is a wetland plant, it is very adaptable and at home in sunny gardens.

Delightful, lightly fragrant, purplish-pink flowers are produce summer through fall. They are born atop upright stems that hold narrow, lance-shaped leaves opposite of each other. The flowers are borne in flat clusters; each flower is complex and topped with a “crown.” The blooms are very attractive...

Image of Asclepias incarnata

Jessie Keith

(Ice Ballet Milkweed, Swamp Milkweed)

Swamp milkweed is native to pond edges and stream banks of the eastern and Midwestern United States. The cultivar ‘Ice Ballet’ bears clear white flowers. Though this perennial is a wetland plant, it is very adaptable and at home in sunny gardens.

Delightful, lightly fragrant flowers are produce summer through fall. They are born atop upright stems that hold narrow, lance-shaped leaves opposite of each other. The flowers are borne in flat clusters; each flower is complex and topped with a “crown.”...