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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 37 of 351.

(Astilbe, False Spirea, Hyacinth Astilbe)

Tall and free-flowering, the hybrid astilbe ‘Hyazinth’ is an herbaceous perennial grown for its tolerance of shade, dependable bloom, plush spikes of flowers, and dark, dense ferny foliage. It blooms in summer at the top of slender upright stems with spikes that have a branching habit a bit like a tall, skinny Christmas tree. Tiny, closely packed, lavender-pink flowers clothe the spikes, transforming them into plush, billowing, plumes that wave in the breeze. One plant may produce several stems,...

Image of Astilbe

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Japanese Astilbe, Japanese False Spirea, Red Sentinel False Spirea)

Red Sentinel astilbe is a clump-forming, herbaceous perennial with summertime plume flowers. It is a tall hybrid cultivar with green leaves and a compact inflorescence of deep crimson red flowers which bloom in midsummer.

'Red Sentinel' requires full sun to partial shade and must be grown in moist, well-drained soils and perform best in shady locations. The flowerheads fade to attractive shades of brown in the fall, providing landscape interest through winter. They function best in shade gardens,...

(Japanese Astilbe, Japanese False Spirea, W.E. Gladstone Japanese Astilbe)

One of many striking hybrids of the East Asian native Astilbe japonica, 'W.E. Gladstone' is a clump-forming perennial grown for its large, feathery, creamy white flower clusters in late spring and early summer. They arise on slender stems above ferny clumps of lustrous rich green foliage.

Astilbes in the Japonica Group prefer partial shade and moist, fertile, well-drained soil, but can tolerate drier and sunnier locations. This low-maintenance perennial looks best when planted in groups...

Image of Astilbe

Mark A. Miller

(Astilbe, Weisse Gloria Astilbe)

Middle-sized and free-flowering, the hybrid astilbe ‘Weisse Gloria’ is an herbaceous perennial grown for its tolerance of shade, dependable bloom, plush spikes of flowers, and toothy, uniform leaves. It blooms in summer at the top of tall, slender upright stems with spikes that have a branching habit a bit like a Christmas tree. Tiny, closely packed, violet flowers clothe the spikes, transforming them into exceptionally plush, billowing, plumes. One plant may produce several stems, making a dense...

Image of Astilbe (Bella Group) photo by: Ernst Benary® Inc.

Ernst Benary® Inc.

(Astilbe, Bella False Spirea, False Spirea)

The plants in the Bella Series are medium-sized astilbes with profuse bloom. Hardy perennials for shade, these plants are stocky and branching, with glossy, dark-green, ferny leaves. The flower spikes that top the stems have a branching habit and tiny, closely packed flowers that clothe the branches and stem, transforming them into feathery plumes in colors ranging from white to deep rose. The flowers can persist for weeks after they dry.

Like most astilbes, these prefer partial sun to partial...

Image of Aurinia saxatilis photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Basket-of-Gold)

The glowing golden flowers of basket-of-gold will brighten any sunny spring border or rock garden. This low-growing perennial is native to the mountainous regions of South and Central Europe and Turkey. It has small, semi-evergreen leaves of gray-green and forms a neat mound. In spring it produces many clusters of small, bright yellow four-petaled flowers. These literally cover the plant and should be lightly sheared off when spent.

Basket-of-gold prefers a sunny site and average, friable soil...

(Carolina Mosquito Fern)

Native to much of the eastern half of North America, Carolina mosquito fern is a tiny, feather aquatic fern that floats on the surface of still ponds and lake edges. Populations also extend down into Mexico and Central America. Its tiny fronds are bright green, often with a reddish or purplish-red hue. It's hard to believe this aquatic, floating plant is in fact a miniscule fern. It is free-floating and may be adapted to fresh or brackish water.

Carolina mosquito fern thrives in pools with full...

Image of Baccharis halimifolia photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Bush Groundsel, Cottonseed Tree, Sea Myrtle)

A puffy-seeded shrub that handles dry and wet soils as well as salty groung, bush groundsel is its prettiest in summer and autumn. Typically evergreen in milder climates, this billowy plant has upright to arching stems that is often lax and floppy, but more rounded shrubs are encountered. It is native to the United States from Massachusetts to Texas as well as in nearby Mexico and the West Indies.

Softly light green, the foliage is small oval leaves with irregular, jae\gged edges. Plants are...

Image of Baptisia australis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Blue False Indigo, Plains False Indigo)

When looking upon a mature false indigo in bloom it looks much like a small shrub, but it’s truly an herbaceous perennial, meaning it dies back to the ground each year. Native populations of false indigo exist across a large part of eastern North America, in all but a few of the most southern states. They tend to grow in old-fields, prairies and other open wild areas. Some Native American tribes used Baptisia roots for medicine and the flowers or flowering stems for the dye they yield. Despite...

Image of Baptisia australis var. minor photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Dwarf Blue False Indigo)

This is a shorter variety of the large, bushy perennial, false indigo, so it's better suited to smaller garden spaces. Native populations of false indigo exist across a large part of eastern North America, in all but a few of the most southern states. They tend to grow in old-fields, prairies and other open wild areas. Some Native American tribes used Baptisia roots for medicine and the flowers or flowering stems for the dye they yield. Despite the common name, false indigo dye is not blue...