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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 79 of 351.

(Dianthus)

The genus Dianthus comprises approximately 300 species and more than 27,000 cultivars. Collectively known as “pinks”, these showy flowering plants have been grown for many hundreds of years. Their common name was given for the sharply-toothed petal tips of their flowers, which look like they were cut by pinking shears.

Nearly all Dianthus species hail from Eurasia and northern Africa, while only one originates from North America. Most are herbaceous tender perennials; however...

(Blue Pygmy Dianthus, Dianthus)

The genus Dianthus comprises approximately 300 species and more than 27,000 cultivars. Collectively known as “pinks”, these showy flowering plants have been grown for many hundreds of years. Their common name was given for the sharply-toothed petal tips of their flowers, which look like they were cut by pinking shears.

Nearly all Dianthus species hail from Eurasia and northern Africa, while only one originates from North America. Most are herbaceous tender perennials; however...

Image of Dianthus superbus photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Fringed Pink)

The genus Dianthus comprises approximately 300 species and more than 27,000 cultivars. Collectively known as “pinks”, these showy flowering plants have been grown for many hundreds of years. Their common name was given for the sharply-toothed petal tips of their flowers, which look like they were cut by pinking shears.

Nearly all Dianthus species hail from Eurasia and northern Africa, while only one originates from North America. Most are herbaceous tender perennials; however...

Image of Dicentra

Terra Nova Nurseries, Inc.

(Hybrid Bleeding Heart, King of Hearts Bleeding Heart)

The hybrid bleeding heart, ‘King of Hearts’, has lovely ferny, blue-green foliage and produces exquisite heart-shaped flowers in spring. It is a complex hybrid between the Japanese bleeding heart Dicentra peregrine and two western American species, D. formosa ssp. oregona and D. eximia. The result is a small, floriferous, mounding perennial with delicate foliage that maintains its beauty into late summer, unlike many other Dicentra.

The rosy-red flowers...

Image of Dicentra eximia photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Fringed Bleeding Heart)

Fringed bleeding heart is a wonderful herbaceous perennial native to the eastern United States. Starting in spring - and continuing all summer in cooler climes - clusters of dark pink, heart shaped flowers are displayed above the grayish-green fern-like foliage. Several excellent selections and hybrids are available, including the white-flowered 'Snowdrift'.

Fringed bleeding heart is happiest in a moist shady site, where it will self-sow and naturalize. Use it in a woodland or shady mixed border.

(Fringed Bleeding Heart, White Bleeding Heart)

Fringed bleeding heart is a wonderful herbaceous perennial native to the eastern United States. Starting in spring - and continuing all summer in cooler climes – this selection, ‘Alba,’ bears heart-shaped, pendent, white flowers in single file at the ends of slender, arching stems that overtop the deeply divided grayish-green, fern-like leaves, which gather in a mounded clump.

Like all fringed bleeding hearts, ‘Alba’ prefers moist, humus-rich soil and partial to full shade. When happy, it self-sows...

Image of Dicentra eximia

Blooms of Bressingham

(Fringed Bleeding Heart)

Fringed bleeding heart is a wonderful herbaceous perennial native to the eastern United States. Starting in spring - and continuing all summer in cooler climes - clusters of dark pink, heart shaped flowers are displayed above the grayish-green fern-like foliage. Several excellent selections and hybrids are available, including the white-flowered 'Snowdrift'.

Fringed bleeding heart is happiest in a moist shady site, where it will self-sow and naturalize. Use it in a woodland or shady mixed border.

Image of Dicentra spectabilis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bleeding Heart, Old-fashioned Bleeding Heart)

Old-fashioned bleeding heart, what a classic garden perennial! This large, bushy ornamental originates from northeastern Asia. In late spring to early summer it produces horizontal, slightly curved stems lined with pendulous, heart-shaped flowers. Its blooms are most commonly vibrant rose-pink with white tips, but white selections are also available. These appear against a backdrop of coarsely toothed, sea green foliage.

Bleeding heart grows best in fertile soil with average drainage. It prefers...

Image of Dicentra spectabilis

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bleeding Heart, White Bleeding Heart)

White bleeding heart, what a classic old-fashioned garden favorite. This large, bushy perennial originates from northeastern Asia. In late spring to early summer it produces horizontal, slightly curved stems lined with white, drooping, heart-shaped flowers against a backdrop of coarsely toothed, sea green foliage.

Bleeding heart grows best in fertile soil with average drainage. It prefers full to part sun, but does not appreciate high heat. In fact, as the summer temperatures rise plants often...

Image of Dicentra spectabilis

Terra Nova Nurseries, Inc.

(Bleeding Heart, Gold Heart Bleeding Heart)

The showy leaves of 'Gold Heart' bring a new look to a classic old-fashioned garden favorite from northeastern Asia. Dangling in loose clusters from thigh-high, arching stems, the purple-pink, heart-shaped flowers are displayed against a background of coarsely toothed, bright gold-chartreuse foliage. Leaf color is less brilliant in hotter, sunnier sites. Plants go semi-dormant in summer, when they can be pruned to the ground. This plant may self-sow.

Bleeding heart grows best in fertile soil...