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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 98 of 351.

Image of Geum coccineum

Ernst Benary® Inc.

(Koi Avens, Scarlet Avens)

This genus comprises around 50 diverse species of herbaceous perennials. These can be found across the globe from the Americas to Europe, Africa and even New Zealand. Only a few are heavily cultivated as garden ornamentals to include Geum coccineum (Red Avens), Geum montanum (Alpine Avens), Geum rivale (Purple Avens), and Geum triflorum (Prairie Smoke).

Geums inhabit a wide range of habitats such as dry open fields, bogs and alpine regions. As with environmental...

Image of Geum rivale photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Chocolate-root, Indian Chocolate, Water Avens)

This genus comprises around 50 diverse species of herbaceous perennials. These can be found across the globe from the Americas to Europe, Africa and even New Zealand. Only a few are heavily cultivated as garden ornamentals to include Geum coccineum (Red Avens), Geum montanum (Alpine Avens), Geum rivale (Purple Avens), and Geum triflorum (Prairie Smoke).

Geums inhabit a wide range of habitats such as dry open fields, bogs and alpine regions. As with environmental...

Image of Geum triflorum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Old Man's Whiskers)

This genus comprises around 50 diverse species of herbaceous perennials. These can be found across the globe from the Americas to Europe, Africa and even New Zealand. Only a few are heavily cultivated as garden ornamentals to include Geum coccineum (Red Avens), Geum montanum (Alpine Avens), Geum rivale (Purple Avens), and Geum triflorum (Prairie Smoke).

Geums inhabit a wide range of habitats such as dry open fields, bogs and alpine regions. As with environmental...

Image of Gleditsia triacanthos photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Honeylocust)

Distinguished by its fine-textured summer leaves and its informal spreading habit, this popular medium to large deciduous tree is native to the central and eastern United States and extreme southern Ontario. Most cultivated honeylocusts are sterile, non-fruiting selections of the thornless variety Gleditisia triacanthos f. inemris.

The bright green, pinnately compound leaves of this cold-hardy tree cast filtered shade. They flush relatively late in spring and turn dull yellow...

Image of Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Thornless Honeylocust)

Distinguished by its fine-textured summer leaves and its informal spreading habit, honeylocust is a ubiquitous medium to large deciduous tree native to the central and eastern United States and extreme southern Ontario. Most garden honeylocusts are sterile, non-fruiting selections of the thornless variety Gleditisia triacanthos f. inemris.

The bright green, pinnately compound leaves of this cold-hardy tree cast filtered shade. They flush relatively late in spring and turn dull...

(Thornless Honeylocust)

Honeylocust is a spiny, lacy-leaved, medium to large deciduous tree native to the central and eastern United States and southern Ontario. Imperial® is a compact, round-crowned, unarmed selection introduced in 1956 by Cole Nursery of Painesville, Ohio.

This cultivar has dainty, bright green, pinnately compound leaves that cast filtered shade. The foliage emerges relatively late in spring and turns dull yellow in autumn. Fallen leaves create relatively little mess. The trunk has gray-brown, shallowly...

Image of Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Thornless Honeylocust)

Honeylocust is a spiny, lacy-leaved, medium to large deciduous tree native to the central and eastern United States and southern Ontario. One of the earliest and most popular honeylocust cultivars, 'Moraine' develops into a broad-crowned, vase-shaped, thornless tree whose form has been likened to that of American elm.

Like most honeylocusts, 'Moraine' has bright green, pinnately compound leaves that cast filtered shade. The foliage emerges relatively late in spring and turns dull yellow in autumn....

Image of Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis

Jesse Saylor

(Thornless Honeylocust)

Honeylocust is a spiny, lacy-leaved, medium to large deciduous tree native to the central and eastern United States and southern Ontario. Introduced in 1964 by Princeton Nurseries of Allentown, New Jersey, 'Rubylace' is a thornless, somewhat weak-growing selection with burgundy-red spring leaves that turn bronze-green in summer.

Like most honeylocusts, 'Rubylace' has pinnately compound leaves that cast filtered shade. They emerge relatively late in spring and turn dull yellow-bronze before dropping...

Image of Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis

Jesse Saylor

(Thornless Honeylocust)

Honeylocust is a spiny, lacy-leaved, medium to large deciduous tree native to the central and eastern United States and southern Ontario. The cultivar 'Shademaster' grows rapidly into a thornless, strong-trunked tree with ascending branches, a symmetrical rounded crown, and dark green foliage that drops relatively late in fall.

Like most honeylocusts, 'Shademaster' has pinnately compound leaves that cast filtered shade. They emerge relatively late in spring and turn dull yellow before dropping...

(Thornless Honeylocust)

Honeylocust is a spiny, lacy-leaved, medium to large deciduous tree native to the central and eastern United States and southern Ontario. Introduced in 1957 by Cole Nursery of Painesville, Ohio, the honeylocust cultivar Skyline® forms a thornless, strong-trunked, symmetrical tree with a conical crown that becomes dome-shaped with age.

Like other honeylocusts, Skyline® has pinnately compound leaves that emerge relatively late in spring and cast filtered shade. This cultivar's leaves are bronze-tinged...