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Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 3

Returned 3509 results. Page 1 of 351.

Image of Abies balsamea photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Balsam Fir)

Balsam fir is a tall coniferous evergreen tree native to the northeastern fifth of the United States and extreme southern Canada. It has a fine pyramidal form, is slow growing and becomes a very tall tree when mature. Its small deep green needles are soft, glossy and smell of sweet balsam. The female cones are full of resin and are brown when mature, and shatter readily when dry. This tree offers year round interest and provides habitat to wildlife, including foliage eaten by deer.

Plants excel...

Image of Abies balsamea

James H. Schutte

(Balsam Fir, Dwarf Balsam Fir)

Dwarf balsam fir is a compact evergreen shrub with fragrant balsam-scented foliage. A very slow growing dwarf, 'Nana' offers year-round interest because of its dense deep green needles and rounded silhouette. When it matures, the shrub's top may become more flattened.

Grow the dwarf balsam fir in full sun to partial shade in a slightly acidic well-drained soil. Evenly moist soil that is cooled with an organic mulch is best. Shade from hot, intense mid-afternoon summer sun keeps the needle quality...

Image of Abies balsamea var. phanerolepis photo by: Mary S. Thomas

Mary S. Thomas

(Bracted Balsam Fir, Canaan Fir)

Balsams are such beautiful evergreen trees for the north, especially this super hardy variety. Canaan fir is naturally distributed in the northeastern United States and Canada. It is distinguished by its hardiness, tight pyramidal form with short ascending branches, and distinctive cones, which have long papery bracts extending from the scales.

This tall coniferous evergreen tree develops a fine pyramidal form, but is slow growing. Its fragrant flattened needles are lustrous and dark green above...

Image of Abies concolor photo by: Mark Kane

Mark Kane

(White Fir)

Widely adaptable with a striking silvery light blue color, white fir is a pyramidal evergreen tree native to western North America, from southwestern Canada to northern Baja California. This large coniferous tree is admired for its short, soft needles of silvery blue-green and its dense symmetrical habit. The female cones are green when immature, then brown at maturity, usually only found in the upper third of the canopy. Its bark is whitish gray and new twigs have a yellow-green hue and are slightly...

Image of Abies concolor

James H. Schutte

(White Fir)

An upright conifer tree with irregular branching, the bluish silver needles of the Blue Cloak white fir seem to gently droop the branch tips. White fir is a pyramidal, slow-growing evergreen tree native to the western United States and adjacent highlands in southwestern Canada. Its cones are oblong and held upright on mature branches. White has a fine-textured symmetrical growth habit, and 'Blue Cloak' becomes a broad pyramid as it matures.

Grow white fir in full to partial sun and a slightly...

(Candicans White Fir, Silver White Fir, White Fir)

Producing perhaps the bluest needles of all selections of white fir, cultivar 'Candicans' produces needles with an intense silvery blue hue. White fir is a pyramidal evergreen tree native to the western United States. Its cones are oblong and held upright on mature branches. The tree has a fine symmetrical growth habit and is an ideal conifer for year round interest, even making an exquisite choice for a Christmas tree.

White fir tree grows best in full sun, slightly acidic, well-drained soil...

Image of Abies concolor

James H. Schutte

(White Fir)

The small-growing white fir cultivar 'Rochester' produces needles that mature to silvery blue but emerge pale chartreuse in spring. White fir is a pyramidal, slow-growing evergreen tree native to the western United States and adjacent highlands in southwestern Canada. Its cones are oblong and held upright on mature branches. White has a fine-textured symmetrical growth habit, even making an exquisite choice for a Christmas tree.

Grow 'Rochester' in full to partial sun and a slightly acidic,...

Image of Abies concolor

Mark A. Miller

(White Fir)

White fir is a pyramidal evergreen tree native to the western United States. The cultivar 'Violacea' has particularly beautiful coloration with intense silvery-blue needles that appear silvery white when new. Their cones are oblong and held upright on mature branches. White fir has a fine symmetrical growth habit and is an ideal native for year round interest. These trees prefer full sun, slightly acidic, well-drained soil and are more tolerant of heat, drought and pollution than other firs. In...

Image of Abies veitchii photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Christmastree, Veitch Fir)

A handsome evergreen with deep green needles that curved upwards to reveal the silvery undersides, veitch fir also produces purplish cones. A tall conifer evergreen that is relatively fast-growing, it is native to central and southern Japan. Its smooth bark is sandy brown to gray in hue.

The non-prickly needles are short and glossy, dark green with silver to blue-green undersides. Needles densely line the branches' end twigs. Male and female cones are borne in late spring; the female cones become...

Image of Acer negundo photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Ash-Leaved Maple, Boxelder)

Box elder is a medium-sized to large, fast growing, short-lived deciduous tree native to many regions in North America. Typically low-branched with furrowed light gray to gray-brown bark, it bears bright green, compound leaves with three or sometimes five leaflets. Inconspicuous greenish yellow flowers emerge with the leaves. Male and female flowers occur on separate trees. Box elder is rarely grown as a landscape tree due to its weedy, weak-wooded nature, but a few cultivars with unique ornamental...