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Returned 748 results. Page 68 of 75.

Image of Pisum sativum

Jessie Keith

(Garden Pea, Snap Pea)

Snap peas have been cultivated in gardens since the 1800s and used to be called “butter peas”, but modern snaps, like ‘Sugar Snap’, bear little resemblance to the old types.

This hybrid was developed in the late 1960s by Dr. Calvin Lamborn and Dr. M. C. Parker for the Gallatin Valley Seed Company, a Boise, Idaho company dedicated to pea breeding and development. It was produced from a cross between a thick-podded shell pea and snow pea and became commercially available in 1979. That year it...

Image of Pisum sativum

James H. Schutte

(Garden Pea)

The shell pea, ‘Tall Telephone’ (sometimes called ‘Alderman’), is an heirloom selection that has been grown since the early 1880s. It produces long vines and large pods full of round, green peas that are remarkably sweet and tender. These can be eaten fresh or dried. The peas of this self-fertile cultivar are generally ready to harvest 70 to 75 day after seeding.

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible...

(Garden Pea, Shelling Pea)

The shelling pea, ‘Wando’, is a relatively heat resistant plant that was introduced in 1943 by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Vegetable Laboratory in Charleston, South Carolina. It is a shrubby, sturdy cultivar that produces lots of medium-sized peas that are shelled and eaten fresh or dried. These tend to mature later than most and are generally ready to harvest 68 to 70 day after seeding.

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea....

(Field Pea, Partridge Pea)

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for thousands of years. Their area of origin is thought to be the eastern Mediterranean region, including Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria, where wild pea plants still exist.

These herbaceous annuals have four distinct cultivation types that bear different fruits, or pea pods. These four types are: pod peas that are shelled for fresh peas, pod peas that...

(Snow Pea)

Few cool season crops are as satisfying as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for thousands of years. Snow, or mangetout, peas are flat and eaten immature (pod and all). If harvested young, these peas are virtually stringless. They are favored in Asian cooking and often used in stir fry. Many cultivars reach maturity 60 days after seeding.

Pea plants are vines, though some have shrubbier habits. Their pale green leaves are compound. The stems are...

(Dwarf Gray Sugar Snow Pea, Snow Pea)

The versatile snow pea, ‘Dwarf Gray Sugar’, is an heirloom selection that has been cultivated for more than 200 years. In recent years, it has resurfaced in popularity because of its tender reddish shoots and flowers and green pods are all edible. This pea cultivar is self-fertile and produces pods early. Days to harvest depend on which part of the plant is harvested. Pea shoots can be harvested in 30 to 32 days, flowers in 40 to 42 days and immature snow pea pods in 57 to 60 days. Plant a few seeds...

Image of Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon

Jessie Keith

(Golden Sweet Snow Pea, Snow Pea)

This snow pea cultivar from India bears flavorful, lime-green pods on tall vines. Days to harvest depend on which part of the plant is harvested. Pea shoots can be harvested in 30 to 32 days, flowers in 40 to 42 days and snow pea pods in 65 to 70 days. Plant a few seeds at weekly intervals for a longer harvest season.

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for thousands of years. Their...

(Mammoth Melting Sugar Snow Pea, Snow Pea)

The super sweet snow pea, 'Mammoth Melting Sugar', is an heirloom selection developed by the United States Department of Agriculture. Its young shoots, flowers and young green pods are all edible. The pods are very large and nearly stringless if harvested when young and tender. This pea is self-fertile and produces loads of pods early. Days to harvest depend on which part of the plant is harvested. Pea shoots can be harvested in 25 to 30 days, flowers in 40 to 45 days and immature snow pea pods in...

(Oregon Sugar Pod Snow Pea, Snow Pea)

The dwarf snow pea, 'Oregon Sugar Pod II', was developed at Oregon State University and is prized for its disease resistance as well as good pod production and short stature. Its young shoots, flowers and young green pods are all edible. The mild-tasting pods are large and nearly stringless if harvested when young and tender. This pea is self-fertile and produces loads of pods early. Days to harvest depend on which part of the plant is harvested. Pea shoots can be harvested in 25 to 30 days, flowers...

Image of Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon

National Garden Bureau

Few cool season crops are as satisfying as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for thousands of years. Snow, or mangetout, peas are flat and eaten immature (pod and all). If harvested young, these peas are virtually stringless. They are favored in Asian cooking and often used in stir fry. Many cultivars reach maturity 60 days after seeding.

Pea plants are vines, though some have shrubbier habits. Their pale green leaves are compound. The stems are...