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Plants Matching vine

Returned 986 results. Page 98 of 99.

(Japanese Wisteria)

A richly colored and precociously blooming selection of a deciduous woody vine that has been cultivated for centuries in its native Japan, 'Texas Purple' bears its tresses of intense blue purple and lavender blossoms even on young plants. The chains of fragrant pea-flowers open sequentially from the base of the flower cluster in late spring. The fragrant blossoms are followed by velvety green bean-like seedpods. The compound foliage is light green and lush. This vigorous twiner grows rapidly into...

Image of Wisteria frutescens photo by: JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

(American Wisteria)

A relatively rarely grown deciduous twining vine from the southeastern United States, this wisteria flowers weeks later in the season than do the more familiar Japanese and Chinese wisterias, making it a valuable contributor to the summer garden. The dense pendulous grape-like clusters of fragrant lilac-purple flowers appear sporadically through much of summer and early fall. Although the flower clusters are smaller and more hidden by foliage than are those of the spring-blooming Asian species, they...

Image of Wisteria frutescens

JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

(American Wisteria, Amethyst Falls Wisteria)

A less rampant and later blooming alternative to the commonly cultivated Asian wisterias, American wisteria is a deciduous twining climber native to the southeastern United States. The cultivar 'Amethyst Falls' bears grape-like clusters of fragrant lavender-blue flowers in late spring and summer on the current season's growth. Although the flower clusters are smaller and more hidden by foliage than are those of the spring-blooming Asian wisterias, they are typically borne at a younger age, often...

Image of Wisteria frutescens

Jessie Keith

(American Wisteria)

A relatively rarely grown deciduous twining vine from the southeastern United States, this wisteria flowers weeks later in the season than do the more familiar Japanese and Chinese wisterias, making it a valuable contributor to the summer garden. The dense pendulous grape-like clusters of fragrant lilac-purple flowers appear sporadically through much of summer and early fall. Although the flower clusters are smaller and more hidden by foliage than are those of the spring-blooming Asian species, they...

(American Wisteria)

A less rampant and later blooming alternative to the commonly cultivated Asian wisterias, American wisteria is a deciduous twining climber native to the southeastern United States. The cultivar 'Nivea' bears grape-like clusters of fragrant white flowers in late spring and summer on the current season's growth. Although the flower clusters are smaller and more hidden by foliage than are those of the spring-blooming Asian wisterias, they are typically borne at a younger age, often the first summer...

Image of Wisteria macrostachya photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Kentucky Wisteria)

Less rampant and later blooming than the commonly cultivated Asian wisterias, and hardier and showier than American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens), Kentucky wisteria is a deciduous twining climber native to the southeastern and central United States. It bears long trusses of fragrant lilac-blue pea-flowers in late spring and early summer on the current season's growth. Rivaling the size of those of Japanese and Chinese wisteria, the dangling flower clusters are typically borne at a younger...

Image of Wisteria macrostachya

Mary S. Thomas

(Kentucky Wisteria)

Less rampant and later blooming than the commonly cultivated Asian wisterias, and hardier and showier than American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens), Kentucky wisteria is a deciduous twining climber native to the southeastern and central United States. The cultivar 'Aunt Dee' bears abundant trusses of fragrant lilac-blue pea-flowers in late spring and early summer on the current season's growth. Rivaling the size of those of Japanese and Chinese wisteria, the dangling flower clusters are typically...

Image of Wisteria macrostachya

James Burghardt

(Clara Mack Wisteria, Kentucky Wisteria)

Less rampant and later blooming than the commonly cultivated Asian wisterias, and hardier and showier than American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens), Kentucky wisteria is a deciduous twining climber native to the southeastern and central United States. The cultivar 'Clara Mack' bears abundant trusses of fragrant white pea-flowers in late spring and early summer on the current season's growth. Rivaling the size of those of Japanese and Chinese wisteria, the dangling flower clusters are typically...

Image of Wisteria sinensis photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Blue Wisteria, Chinese Wisteria)

Introduced to Western gardens in 1816, this native of China is a rampant, hardy, deciduous woody vine that blooms showily in late spring with long hanging clusters of lightly fragrant pea-like flowers in lilac-purple or white, followed by hanging velvety green pods. The flowers open in unison, providing a spectacular display. The bright green pinnate leaves usually have 11 leaflets. This massive twiner can literally cover acres if allowed to romp freely. There are many cultivars, including white-flowered...

Image of Wisteria sinensis

Maureen Gilmer

(Chinese Wisteria)

Introduced to Western gardens from its native China in 1816, Wisteria sinensis is a rampant, hardy, deciduous woody vine that blooms showily in late spring with long cascading clusters of lightly fragrant pea-flowers. The cultivar 'Alba' bears white flowers. They open in unison, providing a spectacular snowy display. Fuzzy green bean-like seedpods follow. The bright green pinnate leaves usually have 11 leaflets. This massive twiner can literally cover acres if allowed to romp freely.

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