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SOLANUM tuberosum 'Adirondack Blue'

Image of Solanum tuberosum 'Adirondack Blue'

Jessie Keith

Family

Solanaceae

Botanical Name

SOLANUM tuberosum 'Adirondack Blue'

Plant Common Name

Adirondack Blue Potato, Blue Potato, Early Potato, Potato

General Description

Don't let the name 'Adirondack Blue' fool you. This flavorful, award-winning potato is purple inside and out. The pleasing color comes from high levels of anthocyanins, which are high in antioxidants, and is maintained even when the potatoes are cooked. This vigorous hybrid potato was bred at Cornell University by Robert Plaisted, Ken Paddock and Walter De Jong and first released in 2003. It is a medium early potato that was developed primarily as a table and French fry potato. The plants of this variety tend to spread and tubers are ready for harvest 70 to 90 days after planting.

Potatoes are tender perennials widely cultivated as seasonal annual crops. They are bushy and have crinkled compound green foliage. Their small, star-shaped flowers bloom in late spring or summer and often lack fertile male pollen. Those of 'Adirondack Blue' are pure white, surprisingly. Bees pollinate the fertile blooms and small, round, seed-filled fruits follow that are greenish yellow.

The starchy potato tubers develop from underground stems. The skin of 'Adirondack Blue' tubers is purplish brown with purple ringed flesh. The small, shallow, pinkish eyes on each tuber are leaf buds that can sprout to form new plants. All green parts of a potato plant are poisonous.

Grow potatoes in full sun and fertile, rich, loamy soil that’s evenly moist but well-drained. Plant seed potatoes deep along berms to increase productivity and make harvest easier. Drought stress and high heat will reduce productivity significantly. The potato is a cool season crop typically grown when conditions are moderately warm and pleasant. In frost-free, subtropical areas they are grown in winter or spring when conditions are more favorable.

Potato beetles are the chief pest and must be regularly removed or they will completely defoliate a plant in no time. Fungal blights also destroy crops. Regular rotation of potato crops will reduce the instances of re-infection with soil-borne fungal diseases.

Potatoes are rarely propagated by seed. Instead, whole small tubers or chunks of tubers with eyes are planted. These are called "seed potatoes" and produce exact clones of parent plants. In temperate regions potatoes should be planted one to three weeks before the last frost date. Though susceptible to frost, they are slow to emerge from the soil. The new shoots can be protected from late frosts with frost cloth. As plants emerge, the soil can be mounded even higher around them to build the hill. Any exposed tubers should be immediately covered because sunlight causes them to turn green and green potatoes are inedible.

After flowering, the plants start to develop their tubers. Once the foliage begins to turn yellow, the tubers may be dug up and eaten, though it is common to raid potato mounds early for new potatoes. The tubers should be stored in a cool, dry, dark location where they can last for months. Never chill potatoes as this will cause them to become sweet and unpalatable.

Characteristics

  • AHS Heat Zone

    12 - 3

  • Sunset Zone

    A1, A2, A3, H1, H2, 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

  • Plant Type

    Tender Perennial

  • Sun Exposure

    Full Sun

  • Height

    18"-24" / 45.7cm - 61.0cm

  • Width

    16"-30" / 40.6cm - 76.2cm

  • Bloom Time

    Early Summer, Summer, Late Summer

  • Native To

    Hybrid Origin, South America, Chile

Growing Conditions

  • Soil pH

    Neutral

  • Soil Drainage

    Well Drained

  • Soil type

    Loam

  • Growth Rate

    Fast

  • Water Requirements

    Average Water

  • Habit

    Clump-Forming

  • Seasonal Interest

    Summer, Fall

Ornamental Features

  • Flower Interest

    Showy

  • Flower Color

    White, Blue, Pink, Lavender

  • Fruit Color

    Green

  • Foliage Color (Spring)

    Green

  • Foliage Color (Summer)

    Green

  • Foliage Color (Fall)

    Green

  • Foliage Color (Winter)

    Green

  • Fragrant Flowers

    No

  • Fragrant Fruit

    No

  • Fragrant Foliage

    No

  • Bark or Stem Fragrant

    No

  • Flower Petal Number

    Single

  • Repeat Bloomer

    No

  • Showy Fruit

    No

  • Edible Fruit

    No

  • Showy Foliage

    No

  • Foliage Texture

    Coarse

  • Foliage Sheen

    Matte

  • Evergreen

    No

  • Showy Bark

    No

Special Characteristics

  • Usage

    Edible, Herb / Vegetable

  • Sharp or Has Thorns

    No

  • Invasive

    No

  • Self-Sowing

    No