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TABEBUIA rosea

Image of Tabebuia rosea

Forest & Kim Starr

Family

Bignoniaceae

Botanical Name

TABEBUIA rosea

Plant Common Name

Mayflower, Pink Poui, Rosy Trumpet Tree

Special Notice

This entry has yet to be reviewed and approved by L2G editors.

General Description

The spring costume of this vigorous subtropical tree is festive and feminine: abundantly showy and rosy pink. The pink poui or rosy trumpet tree is indeed one of the showiest for a garden, rivaling the deeper-colored blooms of the ipe (Handroanthus impetiginosus). This briefly deciduous forest tree is native from southern Mexico to Venezuela and Colombia. Rosy trumpet tree is prized as a timber tree, yielding a dense wood used in construction, as fuel or manufacturing musical instruments, doors and furniture. The trunk often divides to create multiple vertical and straight boles with sandy gray bark.

The floppy leaves are compound, resembling hands. There are five leaflets in each leaf, with one larger central leaflet. The two outermost, lower leaflets are markedly smaller in size (which helps differentiate this species from other pink-flowering trumpet trees). Leaflets edges are smooth. Anytime from late winter to late spring during the depths of the dry season, clusters of trumpet-shaped flowers cover the branches. Depending on soil moisture, foliage may be present or absent. Each blossom is fragrant and ranges in color from light pink to deep rosy pink with yellow or white throats. Sparse reblooming occurs in summer and fall during dry spells. Bees pollinate the flowers, leading to production of smooth seed pods that yield copious numbers of seeds. Disseminated by the wind, the seeds germinate as fast-growing seedlings, often creating a weedy, noxious population.

Grow rosy trumpet tree in abundant sunshine in any deep, fertile soil that has average drainage. This species excels in soils that are occasionally soggy or flooded, but also survives in slightly drier environs. For the showiest flower display, halt irrigation in winter to ensure all foliage drops away before any blossoms appear. Use this tree as a specimen shade tree in a park or yard or lining an avenue.

In some tropical regions, this beautiful flowering timber tree is considered invasive and not favored. It's difficult to disregard because of the potentially breathtaking early spring flower displays each year.

Characteristics

  • AHS Heat Zone

    12 - 9

  • USDA Hardiness Zone

    10 - 13

  • Sunset Zone

    H1, H2, 23, 24

  • Plant Type

    Tree

  • Sun Exposure

    Full Sun, Partial Sun

  • Height

    40'-85' / 12.2m - 25.9m

  • Width

    30'-50' / 9.1m - 15.2m

  • Bloom Time

    Early Spring, Spring, Late Spring

  • Native To

    Mexico, Central America, South America

Growing Conditions

  • Soil pH

    Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline

  • Soil Drainage

    Average

  • Soil type

    Clay, Loam, Sand

  • Tolerances

    Wet Site, Drought

  • Growth Rate

    Medium

  • Water Requirements

    Drought Tolerant, Average Water

  • Habit

    Oval/Rounded

  • Seasonal Interest

    Spring

Ornamental Features

  • Flower Interest

    Showy

  • Flower Color

    Pink, Light Pink, Rose

  • Flower Color Modifier

    Bicolor

  • Fruit Color

    Sandy Brown

  • Foliage Color (Spring)

    Green, Light Green

  • Foliage Color (Summer)

    Green

  • Foliage Color (Fall)

    Green

  • Foliage Color (Winter)

    Green

  • Bark Color

    Tan, Sandy Brown

  • Fragrant Flowers

    Yes

  • Fragrant Fruit

    No

  • Fragrant Foliage

    No

  • Bark or Stem Fragrant

    No

  • Flower Petal Number

    Single

  • Repeat Bloomer

    Yes

  • Showy Fruit

    No

  • Edible Fruit

    No

  • Showy Foliage

    Yes

  • Foliage Texture

    Medium

  • Foliage Sheen

    Glossy

  • Evergreen

    Semi-Evergreen

  • Showy Bark

    No

Special Characteristics

  • Bark Texture

    Smooth

  • Usage

    Feature Plant, Shade Trees, Street Trees, Tropical

  • Sharp or Has Thorns

    No

  • Invasive

    Sometimes

  • Self-Sowing

    Yes