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Plants Matching artemisia

Returned 26 results. Page 1 of 3.

Image of Artemisia photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Artemisia)

Some species in the genus Artemisia have been cultivated for centuries. Cultivated forms were traditionally used medicinally or as herbs to flavor food. In recent years many more have become valued as garden ornamentals.

The origin of the name “Artemisia” is not clear. Some say it was named for the mythological goddess Artemis while others claim it is named for the ancient botanist Artemis, who was wife, sister and successor to the Greek King Mausolus. This large and extremely...

Image of Artemisia abrotanum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Southernwood)

Southernwood is a deciduous to semi-evergreen shrub that produces fragrant gray green, feathery, foliage. This southern Europe native has panicles of insignificant yellowish gray flowers in late summer.

Southernwood does best in well drained, fertile soil and full sun. In heavy soils the plant will be short lived. The lemon-scented foliage of this plant is of much interest and is a great addition to any shrub border. It has some medicinal purposes and be of use to people with an interest in...

Image of Artemisia absinthium photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Absinthe, Wormwood)

Absinth, or wormwood, is a clump forming, woody, perennial that is native to Europe and Asia. The aromatic, hairy, silver gray foliage also bears panicles of insignificant grayish yellow flowers.

This plant is best grown in rich, well drained soil and full sun. It is commonly used as an ingredient in the liquor absinthe and has other medicinal purposes that may be useful for an herb garden. It is also excellent in a rock garden or in the background in a perennial border. It is a lovely companion...

(Absinthe, Variegated Absinthe)

Variegated absinth, or wormwood, is a clump forming, semi-woody, perennial that is native to Europe and Asia. It has a large, shrubby habit and fine, aromatic, silver gray and white foliage. In early summer it bears panicles of insignificant gray-yellow flowers.

This plant is best grown in full sun and average to poor soil with perfect drainage. It is commonly used as an ingredient in the liquor absinthe and has other medicinal purposes, so it is useful in the herb garden. The variegated form...

Image of Artemisia alba photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Wormwood)

Some species in the genus Artemisia have been cultivated for centuries. Cultivated forms were traditionally used medicinally or as herbs to flavor food. In recent years many more have become valued as garden ornamentals.

The origin of the name “Artemisia” is not clear. Some say it was named for the mythological goddess Artemis while others claim it is named for the ancient botanist Artemis, who was wife, sister and successor to the Greek King Mausolus. This large and extremely...

Image of Artemisia annua photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Annual Wormwood, Sweet Annie)

Some species in the genus Artemisia have been cultivated for centuries. Cultivated forms were traditionally used medicinally or as herbs to flavor food. In recent years many more have become valued as garden ornamentals.

The origin of the name “Artemisia” is not clear. Some say it was named for the mythological goddess Artemis while others claim it is named for the ancient botanist Artemis, who was wife, sister and successor to the Greek King Mausolus. This large and extremely...

Image of Artemisia californica photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(California Sagebush)

Some species in the genus Artemisia have been cultivated for centuries. Cultivated forms were traditionally used medicinally or as herbs to flavor food. In recent years many more have become valued as garden ornamentals.

The origin of the name “Artemisia” is not clear. Some say it was named for the mythological goddess Artemis while others claim it is named for the ancient botanist Artemis, who was wife, sister and successor to the Greek King Mausolus. This large and extremely...

Image of Artemisia californica

Jesse Saylor

(California Sagebush, Canyon Grey California Sagebush)

Some species in the genus Artemisia have been cultivated for centuries. Cultivated forms were traditionally used medicinally or as herbs to flavor food. In recent years many more have become valued as garden ornamentals.

The origin of the name “Artemisia” is not clear. Some say it was named for the mythological goddess Artemis while others claim it is named for the ancient botanist Artemis, who was wife, sister and successor to the Greek King Mausolus. This large and extremely...

Image of Artemisia campestris photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Sagewort)

Some species in the genus Artemisia have been cultivated for centuries. Cultivated forms were traditionally used medicinally or as herbs to flavor food. In recent years many more have become valued as garden ornamentals.

The origin of the name “Artemisia” is not clear. Some say it was named for the mythological goddess Artemis while others claim it is named for the ancient botanist Artemis, who was wife, sister and successor to the Greek King Mausolus. This large and extremely...

Image of Artemisia dracunculus photo by: JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

(French Tarragon)

The fragrant leaves of tarragon lend herbal sweetness to vegetables, salads and meats. Native from Europe to western North America, it is a clump-forming, shrubby perennial herb that's sun-loving and quite easy to grow. It is related to wormwood and absinthe and a member of the sunflower family, Asteraceae.

The aromatic, green, strap-like leaves of tarragon appear in spring, when they are at their sweetest. In summer insignificant clusters of yellowish white flowers may be produced. Stems of...